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Well, I can do that through logic, but I bet there is a mathematical operation or expression to do that. Does one exist? If yes, what is it?

Here is the algorithm:

private int calcNumberOfLongs(int size) {
    if (size % 64 == 0) {
        return size / 64;
    } else {
        return size / 64 + 1;
    }
}

Let me be clear what I want:

For 150 bits I need three 64-bit longs. Two of course only gives me 128 bits. So that's the first computation.

The second computation, this one even more important because it will be executed all the time, is to go from bit position to long. For example:

bit 5 -> first long
bit 64 -> first long
bit 65 -> second long
bit 140 -> third long

What is the mathematical expression and / or bitwise operation to get this information?


Ok, from the answer below it looks like to go from bit position to long, we just use:

long position = bit position / 64

The continuation is here: How to turn a division into a bitwise shift when power of two?

share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with always return size / 64 + 1; –  aviad Dec 9 '12 at 4:11
    
@aviad Because that'd return 2 when size = 64, when the correct answer is 1. –  K Mehta Dec 9 '12 at 4:13
    
@Kshitij Mehta - smart a**s :) aviad was basically correct. How about ((return size - 1) / 64) + 1. Or better, as PeterJ said: (size + GRANULE_SIZE - 1) / GRANULE_SIZE, here (size + 63) / 64. –  paulsm4 Dec 9 '12 at 4:17
    
@Kshitij Mehta, who cares? –  aviad Dec 9 '12 at 4:26
    
@chrisapotek: also consider using Java BigInteger –  paulsm4 Dec 9 '12 at 4:42

1 Answer 1

I don't believe there is a built-in function to do it although you could simplify your code to:

return (size + 63) / 64;
share|improve this answer
    
simplest answer, Long.SIZE can be used to make it look move universal –  hoaz Dec 9 '12 at 4:16
    
How did you know that? I mean, what is the mathematical rationale behind that expression? –  chrisapotek Dec 9 '12 at 4:16
2  
Yeah, this is an expression that's needed frequently in code that allocates buffers, etc. Good to become familiar with it. Generic is (size + GRANULE_SIZE - 1) / GRANULE_SIZE –  Hot Licks Dec 9 '12 at 4:18
    
(It makes use of the properties of integer arithmetic.) –  Hot Licks Dec 9 '12 at 4:21
    
How do you go from bit position to index? Same expression? –  chrisapotek Dec 9 '12 at 4:23

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