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I have a class Test:

class Test 
  attr_accessor :data
  def initialize
    @data = [0, 1, 2, 3]
  end
  def map
    @data.map!{|i| i = yield i }
  end
end

and I attempt to use it like:

a = Test.new

a.map{|i|
  if(i==2)
    i+=1
    break i  #<--- -This line is the focus
  else
    1
  end
}

puts a.data

The output I expect is [1, 1, 3, 3]. Instead, I get [1, 1, 2, 3]. The last iteration of the block in map doesn't return the modified i.

I replaced break i with next i. This performed as I expected, and produced the output [1, 1, 3, 1].

How can I modify this piece of code (or, ideally the line I point out in my second code-snippet) so that I would get the output [1, 1, 3, 3]? In other words, how can I make the block finish, but pass one last value back to map? Is there a neat and readable way to do this (besides, say, toggling a boolean flag break_now)?

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3 Answers 3

I'm assuming you're asking how to leave a block and make use of the last value that was calculated rather than how to calculate a specific set of numbers; for the latter, there is probably a clever one-liner.

How about something like this:

class Test
  attr_accessor :data

  def initialize
    @data = [0, 1, 2, 3]
  end

  def modify
    @data.map! {|i| yield i }
  end
end

a = Test.new
a.modify do |i|
  break i if @done
  @done = i == 2
  @done ? (i + 1) : 1
end

puts a.data

An additional thought—#map is an important method in Ruby with a specific interface. In your example you're violating the interface by modifying a field in Test. For this reason I've used the name #modify instead.

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Thank you very much for your answer. Could you clarify what #map is meant to do - I thought this was pretty much it? –  Paul Dec 9 '12 at 4:47
    
@Paul: Depending on how it is called, #map returns an Array or an Enumerable without modifying the object on which it is called. –  Eric Walker Dec 9 '12 at 4:48
    
@Paul: I should correct the previous comment -- make that an enumerator, not necessarily Enumerable. –  Eric Walker Dec 9 '12 at 4:54

In general, you could get away with this by modifying the yielded values in place. For example, if your array consisted of Strings instead of Fixnums:

class Test
  attr_accessor :data

  def initialize
    @data = %w{a b c d}
  end

  def map
    @data.map! { |i| yield i }
  end
end

a = Test.new
a.map do |i|
  if i == 'c'
    i.next!
    break
  else
    'b'
  end
end

p a.data   #=> ["b", "b", "d", "d"]

The problem with your example is this:

Fixnum objects have immediate value. This means that when they are assigned or passed as parameters, the actual object is passed, rather than a reference to that object. Assignment does not alias Fixnum objects. There is effectively only one Fixnum object instance for any given integer value…

Fixnums can't be altered in-place, so your expression i += 1 in the lower block doesn't affect the value of i in the upper block. That's why you get 2 in your example but d in my example.

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You have to do this:

a.map{ |i| (i % 2 == 0) ? i + 1 : i }

When you use map function you don't change 'a' variable, if you want change 'a' variable do this:

a.map!{ |i| (i % 2 == 0) ? i + 1 : i }

The new value of 'i' is the value return by the block, so don't do something like:

a.map{|i| i = 1 }

because if you do:

a.map{|i| i = 1; 5 }

the result will be:

 [5, 5, 5, 5]
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2  
I think he's asking about how to leave the block while making use of the current value rather than the specific numerical values that are mentioned in the example. –  Eric Walker Dec 9 '12 at 4:40

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