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I have the following function which takes a list and returns two sublists split at a given element n. However, I only need to split it in half, with odd length lists having a larger first sublist

splitlist :: [a] -> Int -> ([a],[a])
splitlist [] = ([],[])
splitlist l@(x : xs) n | n > 0     = (x : ys, zs)
               | otherwise = (l, [])
    where (ys,zs) = splitlist xs (n - 1)

I know I need to change the signature to [a] -> ([a],[a]), but where in the code should I put something like length(xs) so that I don't break recursion? Thank you.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do it using take and drop:

splitlist :: [a] -> ([a],[a])
splitlist [] = ([],[])
splitlist l  = let half = (length(l) +1)`div` 2
               in (take half l, drop half l)

or you can take advantage of the function splitAt:

splitlist list = splitAt ((length (list) + 1) `div` 2) list
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Thank you very much –  js7354 Dec 9 '12 at 5:10
    
Np, you welcome –  dreamcrash Dec 9 '12 at 5:10
    
(take half l, drop half l) is the same as splitAt half l. The first equation is redundant. The whole thing simplifies to splitlist xs = splitAt (length xs + 1 `div` 2) xs –  dave4420 Dec 9 '12 at 12:21
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In a real program you should probably use

splitlist :: [a] -> ([a], [a])
splitlist xs = splitAt ((length xs + 1) `div` 2) xs

(i.e. something along the lines of dreamcrash's answer.)

But if, for learning purposes, you're looking for an explicitly recursive solution, study this:

splitlist :: [a] -> ([a], [a])
splitlist xs = f xs xs where
    f (y : ys) (_ : _ : zs) = let (as, bs) = f ys zs in (y : as, bs)
    f (y : ys) (_ : [])     =                           (y : [], ys)
    f ys       []           =                           ([],     ys)
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+1, thanks for point that out. –  dreamcrash Dec 9 '12 at 13:52
    
Btw, I don't if it is because I am compiling on codepad, but length xs + 1 'div' 2 it is necessary to put length (xs + 1) 'div' 2 –  dreamcrash Dec 9 '12 at 14:00
    
No, it's because I didn't test my code. Thanks for spotting it. –  dave4420 Dec 9 '12 at 14:02
    
oh ok, np, you welcome. –  dreamcrash Dec 9 '12 at 14:03
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