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I am new in WCF and I have the following question:

1) I want to create one big WCF service, rather than several small ones. It's like an implementation of the façade design pattern.

Why? I need to sessions for clients and I need to store sensitive information(access token, username, API key) about clients and validate it. In this way I just create private fields:

[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerSession)]
public class ApplicationService : IApplicationService
{
     private string _accessToken;
     private string _userName;

     public OrderResponse GetOrder(OrderRequest request)
     {
          var response = new OrderResponse();
          var result = Validate(request, response);
          ... other code
     }

     public CustomerResponse GetCustomer(CustomerRequest request)
     {
          var response = new CustomerResponse();
          var result = Validate(request, response);
          ... other code
     }

     public LoginResponse Login(LoginRequest request)
    {
          var response = new LoginResponse();
          var result = Validate(request, response);
          ... other code
     }

     public LogoutResponse Logout(LogoutRequest request)
     {
          var response = new LogoutResponse();
          var result = Validate(request, response);
          ... other code
     }

     public bool Validate(BaseRequest request, BaseResponse response)
     {
          if(request.Token != _accessToken)
               return false;

          ... validate other fields

          return true   
     }

     // many other methods

}

2) If I create the one big service which contain all other WCF services. Also, it's like an implementation of the façade design pattern.:

[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode = InstanceContextMode.PerSession)]
    public class ApplicationService : IApplicationService
    {
         private string _accessToken;
         private string _userName;
         private LoginService _loginService;
         private CustomerService _customerService;
         private OrderService _orderService;

         public ApplicationService()
         {
              _loginService = new LoginService();
              _orderService = new OrderService();
              _customerService = new CustomerService();
         }

         public OrderResponse GetOrder(OrderRequest request)
         {
              var response = new OrderResponse();
              var result = Validate(request, response);
              if(!result) return Something;
              return _orderService.GetOrder(request);
         }

         public CustomerResponse GetCustomer(CustomerRequest request)
         {
              var response = new CustomerResponse();
              var result = Validate(request, response);
              if(!result) return Something;
              return _customerService.GetCustomer(request);
         }

         public LoginResponse Login(LoginRequest request)
         {
              var response = new LoginResponse();
              var result = Validate(request, response);
              if(!result) return Something;
              return _loginService.Login(request);
         }

         public LogoutResponse Logout(LogoutRequest request)
         {
              var response = new LogoutResponse();
              var result = Validate(request, response);
              if(!result) return Something;
              return _LoginService.Logout(request);
         }

         // many other methods
    }

What you think about this?

3) One more question: when validate failure what must I return? Throw the FaultException or can I return error message in response object? What is good practice?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Please specify your question at each point (1), (2) and (3)... Also how are u utilizing accessToken etc and where do they get populated, please make it explicit? –  Adil Dec 9 '12 at 5:48
    
@AdilMughal: The accessToken clients gets via call GetToken method. This method return token to client and save in private field of servce. Then when clients make request it put this access token to request. In the validate method accessToken saved in service compare with token saved in request object. –  user1260827 Dec 9 '12 at 6:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For 1 and 2: Creating Facade is not a bad thing, but the objective of creating facade matters. If all you wanted to achieve is pass accessToken etc. in each request then perhaps you can pass them in SOAP headers. And if you have .net client then utilize the behavior extensions to pass our custom parameters in each WCF service request. See blog post.

Also, once client have accessToken from GetToken then let client store it and pass it with every service call instead of creating session on server with client. This would also help you in scaling your service and would make service workable in case of session lost.

In this way you can validate client accessToken and also abstracting away the client validation logic from your Business logic.

For 3: When you validate client parameters it's better to throw FaultException as it generates SOAPFault under the hood

share|improve this answer
    
If there are will be not .NET clients: ipad, android devices, 3-rd party sites? –  user1260827 Dec 9 '12 at 6:31
    
@user1260827: Then you can still pass values in headers... but then for mobile devices we typically create a RESTful HTTP Web APIs (at times a wrapper over SOAP services) passing around JSON for data and utilizing Http Headers for client authentication or authorization fields –  Adil Dec 9 '12 at 6:39

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