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public class Test {
    static Vector<String> v;
    public static void main(String args[]){
        for(;;){
            v = new Vector<String>();
            v = null;
        }
    }   
}

Can any one please tell me, Will this code throw StackOverflow Exception at some time or it will not? I tried by running this code for 2 hours with min JVM memory , My program is still running?

share|improve this question
    
You'd have to keep all the references, stick them in an array or something. – dakotapearl Dec 9 '12 at 5:27
1  
You've already proven that it won't. Next question. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 9 '12 at 5:30
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels +1 – ElderMael Dec 9 '12 at 5:43

When there are no longer any references to the memory, Java is free to garbage-collect it and return it to the available heap.

You may or may not see an Out of Memory exception, depending on how much memory you start with, and how often the garbage collection runs.

But you should never see a Stack Overflow exception, since you're not allocating memory from the stack.

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In your code , vector is created in a loop, thus It's a local variable and you don't have access to the previously created object.

So Garbage collector cleans it up. It won't give you memory warning.

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It need not throw OutOfMemory as Garbage Collector will free the created Vectors.

You will need to keep the references.

Try following code

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Vector;

public class Test {
  static Vector<String> v;
  static List<Vector> list= new ArrayList<Vector>();
  public static void main(String args[]){
    for(;;){
       v = new Vector<String>();
       list.add(v);
     }
   }

}

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Your code won't throw any exception. Nor even OutOfMemoryError because of this code:

for(;;){
    v = new Vector<String>();
    v = null;
}

The object created at v = new Vector<String>(); can be reclaimed by the garbage collector after the line v = null; So your code will continue... forever!

If you need a StackOverflowError, make a recursive call without returning at some point. Something like this:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]){
        Test.main(args);
    }   
}

To throw a OutOfMemoryError just do this:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]) {

        Vector<Integer> v = new Vector<Integer>();

        for(;;)
            v.add(new Integer(10));

    }
}

That code will add a Integer to the vector infinitely, allocating space for such integer and for the entry inside the vector. Sooner the memory will be depleted.

You even can change v.add(new Integer(10)); for v.add(10); because adding entries to the vector also consumes memory.

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What is happening in your code is that every time a new Object is created in memory its reference is being set to v.

But as soon as the loop goes to the next iteration, there is a new object created and v now points to that new object.

The old object is no longer referenced so it will be garbage collected. So as your iteration is progressing there are objects created and garbage collected so you will never go out of memory or cause a stack overflow.

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