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I understand the >>> fixes the overflow: when adding two big positive longs you may endup with a negative number. Can someone explain how this bitwise shift magically fixes the overflow problem? And how it is different than >> ?


My suspicious: I think it has to do with the fact that Java uses two-compliments so the overflow is the right number if we had the extra space but because we don't it becomes negative. So when you shift and paddle with zero it magically gets fixed due to the two-compliments. But I can be wrong and someone with a bitwise brain has to confirm. :)

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I assume you're referring to the binary-search bug? –  Mehrdad Dec 9 '12 at 6:20
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How do you know it fixes the overflow problem? Also, what overflow problem? –  Articuno Dec 9 '12 at 6:21
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Joshua Bloch told me: googleresearch.blogspot.com/2006/06/… –  JohnPristine Dec 9 '12 at 6:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 33 down vote accepted

In short, (high + low) >>> 1 is a trick that uses the unused sign-bit to perform a correct average of non-negative numbers.


Under the assumption that high and low are both non-negative, we know for sure that the upper-most bit (the sign-bit) is zero.

So both high and low are in fact 31-bit integers.

high = 0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 = 1073741824
low  = 0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 = 1073741824

When you add them together they may "spill" over into the top-bit.

high + low =       1000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
           =  2147483648 as unsigned 32-bit integer
           = -2147483648 as signed   32-bit integer

(high + low) / 2   = 1100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 = -1073741824
(high + low) >>> 1 = 0100 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 = 1073741824
  • As a signed 32-bit integer, it is overflow and flips negative. Therefore (high + low) / 2 is wrong because high + low could be negative.

  • As unsigned 32-bit integers, the sum is correct. All that's needed is to divide it by 2.

Of course Java doesn't support unsigned integers, so the best thing we have to divide by 2 (as an unsigned integer) is the logical right-shift >>>.

In languages with unsigned integers (such as C and C++), it gets trickier since your input can be full 32-bit integers. One solution is: low + ((high - low) / 2)


Finally to enumerate the differences between >>>, >>, and /:

  • >>> is logical right-shift. It fills the upper bits with zero.
  • >> is arithmetic right-shift. It fills the upper its with copies of the original top bit.
  • / is division.

Mathematically:

  • x >>> 1 treats x as an unsigned integer and divides it by two. It rounds down.
  • x >> 1 treats x as a signed integer and divides it by two. It rounds towards negative infinity.
  • x / 2 treats x as a signed integer and divides it by two. It rounds towards zero.
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Not sure when you want to use >>> and when you want to use >>. I think in that case we chose >>> to fix a possible overflow (sign bit spill) problem. What is the rule of thumb to choose between >> and >>> ? –  JohnPristine Dec 9 '12 at 6:45
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>>> is logical right-shift. It fills the upper-bits with zero. >> is the arithmetic right-shift. It fills the upper-bits with copies of the original top-bit. Mathematically, >>> 1 treats the number as unsigned and divides by two rounding down. >> 1 treats the number as signed and rounds down towards negative infinity. / 2 treats the number as signed and rounds towards zero. –  Mysticial Dec 9 '12 at 6:47

I'd suggest to read Joch Bloch's http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2006/06/extra-extra-read-all-about-it-nearly.html#!/2006/06/extra-extra-read-all-about-it-nearly.html about high and low

"The version of binary search that I wrote for the JDK contained the same bug. It was reported to Sun recently when it broke someone's program, after lying in wait for nine years or so."

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It zero-fills the topmost bits instead of sign-filling them.

int a = 0x40000000;
(a + a)  /  2 == 0xC0000000;
(a + a) >>> 1 == 0x40000000;
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See my edit to the question... –  JohnPristine Dec 9 '12 at 6:29
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@JohnPristine: Well, a 2's complement CPU performs the addition in exactly the same way for signed and unsigned integers... the only difference is in the / 2. So up to that point, everything is correct. And obviously, since there's enough bits to represent the sum, there's enough bits to represent the quotient, and >>> 1 does just that. The only reason / 2 is wrong is that it tries to correct for the sign, and obviously >>> 1 performs a bitwise right shift, which is the same as unsigned division by 2... hence it must work correctly. I'm not sure if that answered your question... –  Mehrdad Dec 9 '12 at 6:31
    
Is my statement correct: "I think it has to do with the fact that Java uses two-compliments so the overflow is the right number if we had the extra space but because we don't it becomes negative. So when you shift and paddle with zero it magically gets fixed" ? –  JohnPristine Dec 9 '12 at 6:36
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@JohnPristine: Aside from the word "magically", yeah. –  Mehrdad Dec 9 '12 at 6:37

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