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(I couldn't find anything related to this, as I don't know what keywords to search for).

I want a simple function - one that prints 3 lines, then erases the 3 lines and replaces with new ones. If it were a single line, I could just print \r or \b and overwrite it.

How can I do this without a Curses library? There must be some escape codes or something for this.

I found some escape codes to print colored text, so I'm guessing there is something similar to overwrite previous lines.

I want this to run on OSX and Ubuntu at least.

Edit: I found this - http://www.perlmonks.org/?displaytype=displaycode;node_id=575125

Is there a list of ALL such available commands?

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

(Short answer: Yes. See "ANSI Escape code" in Wikipedia for a complete list of ANSI sequences. Your terminal may or may not be ANSI, but ANSI sequence support seems pretty common - a good starting point at least). The commands depends on the terminal you are using, or these days of course the terminal emulator. Back in the day there were physical boxes with names such as "VT-100" or "Ontel". Each implemented whatever set of escape sequence commands they chose.

Lately of course we only use emulators. Nearly every sort of command line type interface operates in a text-window that emulates something or other.

Curses is a library that allowes your average programmer to write code to manipulate the terminal without having to know how to code for each of the many difference terminals out there. Kind like printer drivers let you print without having to know the details of any particular printer.

First you need to find out what kind of terminal you are using. Then you can look up the specific commands. One possible answer is here. "ANSI" is a common one, typical of MSDOS.

Or, use curses and be happy for it :-)

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