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I am trying to create a bunch of variables like this:

function l(){
    var a1 = 2,
        a2 = 4,
        a3 = 6,
        a4 = 8,
          .
          .
        a20 = 40;
}

But this is taking too many lines, and I am searching for a way to do it smarter. This is what I have come up:

function l(){
    for(var i=0; i<20; i++){
        var ("a"+i) = 2*i;
    }
}

But it probably won't work, and if it works (it does not) the variables will still be inside the for scope. Any ideas?

window["a"+i] or eval(...)

These don't work because I don't want them to be in the global scope.

Usually an Array would be fine, but I am just experimenting if this is possible in JavaScript. Maybe in the future I would encounter something like this.

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1  
Just a note: they will not be in the for scope--everything in JavaScript is function scoped. –  JoshRagem Dec 9 '12 at 6:54
1  
i would suggest using an array –  Justin Gingy McDonald Dec 9 '12 at 6:55
    
If you really don't want to use an array for whatever reason, and you dont want to use window because of global scope, just replace window with some other var... –  Chris Dec 9 '12 at 6:58
1  
@Derek they are only scoped within the for statement if you use let instead of var. But let is part of ES6. It's in Firefox now, though. But Josh is right, they are function scoped, not block-scoped because you used var. –  Ray Toal Dec 9 '12 at 6:59
    
@RayToal - Oh yeah you are right. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Derek 朕會功夫 Dec 9 '12 at 7:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Don't do this. Do. Not. Do. This. Use an array.


Given the trouble you're having creating them programmatically, how do you think you'd refer to them programmatically?

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You do have a point. So I guess creating variables programmatically is not possible in JavaScript then. (And probably not useful in any case.) –  Derek 朕會功夫 Dec 9 '12 at 7:00
    
It can be quite useful for DSLs. Then, using eval (as Akhil Sekharan described) is the way to go. It allows to extend the local scope without polluting the global one. –  Otts Aug 6 at 10:44

I guess its better for you to go with an array, like:

function l(){
    var a = [];
    for(var i=0; i<20; i++){
        a[i] = 2*i;
    }
}

Or if you really want the long list of variables, try this. But its using eval()

function l(){
    var js = '';
    for(var i=0; i<20; i++){
        js += 'var a'+i+' = '+2*i+';'
    }
    eval (js);
}
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1  
Why new Array() instead of []? And why is there any reason to use eval here at all? –  Matt Ball Dec 9 '12 at 7:00
    
It's not recommended. Only if he want a long list of variables like a1,a2,a3..... –  Akhil Sekharan Dec 9 '12 at 7:02

As a matter of fact, I think use object is a good idea.

var scopre = {}
for (var i=1;i<=20;i++) {
  scopre['a'+i] = 'stuff';   
}

The result will be you have a scope object that contain every newly create variable you want!

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