Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there some sort of standard or convention on naming JavaScript prototypes?

I find myself in the need to add methods on prototypes of both native and user-defined functions quite often, and so I usually store the prototypes themselves in local variables:

var functionPrototype = Function.prototype;
var objectPrototype = Object.prototype;
var arrayPrototype = Array.prototype;

Although the names are very descriptive, they are unnecessarily long.

share|improve this question
    
hmmm, I have used prototype a lot and have never seen a standard convention for this... Might require me actually to pull out some of my old javascript books. –  ryan Dec 9 '12 at 7:58
1  
"Unnecessarily long" - why do you have restrictions on length of the names? Your names are readable perfectly fine, and size of identifiers does not really matter for final minified scripts... –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 9 '12 at 8:00
    
@AlexeiLevenkov - I agree, but the shorter the name the sweeter. Just a matter of style. As long as you decide on a convention and stick to it, it really doesn't matter. –  Aadit M Shah Dec 9 '12 at 8:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe that there's no standard convention on naming prototype objects. So I created my own standard.

As I mentioned in my comment above choosing a standard is just a matter of style or preference. However once you choose one you should stick to it.

Here's the standard I use now:

var functProto = Function.prototype;
var objectProto = Object.prototype;
var arrayProto = Array.prototype;

var boolProto = Boolean.prototype;
var numberProto = Number.prototype;
var stringProto = String.prototype;

var classProto = Class.prototype;
var rectProto = Rectangle.prototype;
var myClassProto = MyClass.prototype;

In general here are the guidelines for naming a prototype:

  1. It should be in camel case.
  2. It should end in Proto.
  3. If the abbreviation of the constructor name is more than 3 characters then use it.
  4. Otherwise use the full name of the constructor.

This keeps very long constructor names like Function, Boolean and Rectangle short while keeping longer names long.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.