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SIMPLIFIED EXAMPLE CODE:

var $ = function(selector, node) { // Selector engine
    var selector = selector.trim(), node = node || document.body;
    if (selector != null) {
        return Array.prototype.slice.call(node.querySelectorAll(selector), 0); }
    }
}

I want to use it like this...:

$("div").innerHTML='It works!';

...not like this...:

$("div")[0].innerHTML='It works only on the specified index!';

...or this:

for(i=0;i<$('div');i++) {
        $("div")[i].innerHTML='It works great but it's ugly!';
}

This is as close as I got. I would like chaining to work and for it to be compatible with native methods:

if(!Array.prototype.innerHTML) { 
    Array.prototype.innerHTML = function(html) {
        for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
            this[i].innerHTML = html;
        }
    }
}

$("div").innerHTML('It works, but it ruins method chaining!');

I decided to build this engine to better learn JavaScript; It's working but I am hoping I can learn some more from the kind members of Stack Overflow. Any help would be much appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
I'd review some of the relevant libraries and frameworks .html() and .text() source code for how they do it, ones like jQuery, MooTools, Prototype, YUI. – Jared Farrish Dec 9 '12 at 7:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I want to use it like this...:

$("div").innerHTML='It works!';

...not like this...:

$("div")[0].innerHTML='It works only on the specified index!';

It sounds like you want to have assigning to innerHTML on your set of results assign to the innerHTML of all of the results.

To do that, you'll have to use a function, either directly or indirectly.

Directly:

var $ = function(selector, node) { // Selector engine
    var selector = selector.trim(),
        node = node || document.body,
        rv;
    if (selector != null) {
        rv = Array.prototype.slice.call(node.querySelectorAll(selector), 0); }
        rv.setInnerHTML = setInnerHTML;
    }
    return rv;
}
function setInnerHTML(html) {
    var index;

    for (index = 0; index < this.length; ++index) {
        this[index].innerHTML = html;
    }
}

// Usage
$("div").setInnerHTML("The new HTML");

There, we define a function, and we assign it to the array you're returning as a property. You can then call that function on the array. (You might want to use Object.defineProperty if it's available to set the setInnerHTML property, so you can make it non-enumerable.)

Indirectly (requires an ES5-enabled JavaScript engine):

var $ = function(selector, node) { // Selector engine
    var selector = selector.trim(),
        node = node || document.body,
        rv;
    if (selector != null) {
        rv = Array.prototype.slice.call(node.querySelectorAll(selector), 0); }
        Object.defineProperty(rv, "innerHTML", {
            set: setInnerHTML
        });
    }
    return rv;
}
function setInnerHTML(html) {
    var index;

    for (index = 0; index < this.length; ++index) {
        this[index].innerHTML = html;
    }
}

// Usage
$("div").innerHTML = "The new HTML";

There, we use Object.defineProperty to define a setter for the property.

In the comments below you say

I have a few prototypes that work when individually attached to the $ function. Example: $('div').makeClass('this'); They do not work when they are chained together. Example: $('div').makeClass('this').takeClass('that');

To make chaining work, you do return this; from each of the functions (so the end of makeClass would do return this;). That's because when you're chaining, such as obj.foo().bar(), you're calling bar on the return value of foo. So to make chaining work, you make sure foo returns this (the object on which foo was called).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply. I was only using innerHTML for demonstration purposes. I'm really curious to see if I can use the engine with other methods as well. – abbotto Dec 9 '12 at 7:53
1  
@o0110o: You're not using the selector engine for anything other than getting the list of matches. If you want to have further methods on your resulting objects, you have two options: Either assign them to each instance as you create it, or (and this is probably the better option) make your result objects not really arrays, but things you create with a prototype that has the additional features you want to add. – T.J. Crowder Dec 9 '12 at 7:56
    
Thanks for your advice T.J. – abbotto Dec 9 '12 at 8:07
    
I have a few prototypes that work when individually attached to the $ function. Example: $('div').makeClass('this'); They do not work when they are chained together. Example: $('div').makeClass('this').takeClass('that'); This is why I want to push the results of each item returned into the method, if that's possible. – abbotto Dec 9 '12 at 8:13
1  
@o0110o: To make chaining work, you do return this from each of the functions (so the end of makeClass would do return this). – T.J. Crowder Dec 9 '12 at 8:15

This is what works; it's a slightly different syntax then I gave in my prior example, but the end result is the same. I had some great help from other Stack Exchange members, thanks again everyone.

var $ = function(selector, node) { // Selector engine
    var selector = selector.trim(), node = node || document.body;
    if (selector != null) {
        return Array.prototype.slice.call(node.querySelectorAll(selector), 0); }
    }
}

if(!Array.prototype.html) { 
    Array.prototype.html = function(html) {
        for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
            this[i].innerHTML = html;
        }
        return this; //<---- Silly me, my original code was missing this.
    }
}

When I run it, everything (including chaining) works as desired:

$("div").html('hello world');

OUTPUT:

<div>hello world</div>

Cheers!

share|improve this answer

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