Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

N3485 20.6.9.1 [allocator.members]/1 says:

Calls to these functions that allocate or deallocate a particular unit of storage shall occur in a single total order, and each such deallocation call shall happen before the next allocation (if any) in this order.

This last requirement confuses me. It looks like the standard is saying that if one allocates a block of memory (let's call it block a), and then allocates another block (let's call it block b), then it is not allowed to deallocate block a until it has deallocated block b.

If this is indeed what this paragraph entails, I don't see how one could implement something like vector's growing in a space efficient manner; because one couldn't allocate a bigger buffer and then deallocate the previously allocated (too small) buffer.

Is this actually what this paragraph means, or am I misreading this section?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Calls to these functions that allocate or deallocate a particular unit of storage shall occur in a single total order, and each such deallocation call shall happen before the next allocation (if any) in this order.

From what it seems to me, it only establishes a happens-before relationship between allocations and deallocations (to prevent concurrency issues arising from incorrect compiler optimisations, possibly). It definitely does not establish a relationship between a and b where a and b are different allocated regions.

Remember that compilers follow the specification, not human logic. The specification aids the compiler programmers remember all the details that need to be taken care of (if it follows specification, it's correct). This is why the specification contains details that one would consider obvious. One of the details is that the deallocation/allocation constitutes a memory barrier.

Compare

reads -> deallocation -> allocation -> writes

with

reads -> deallocation
allocation -> writes

Without a happens-before relationship, two threads may use the same memory region (unit of storage) concurrently, as observed by the memory region. With a happens-before relationship, all access from the deallocating thread must be flushed before the allocating thread gets to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 -- Oh, could the intent be that you can't call allocate on two different threads and get the same pointer back in both? –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '12 at 8:14
    
@BillyONeal remember that compilers follow the specification, not human logic. The specification aids the compiler programmers remember all the details that need to be taken care of (if it follows specification, it's correct). –  Jan Dvorak Dec 9 '12 at 8:17
    
I don't understand what you mean by that comment in relation to this answer/question/comment. Yes, compilers follow the spec; but humans implement the compiler so humans (and in this case, me) need to understand what is going on in order to follow the spec correctly. One needs to understand what is going on here in order to write a conformant allocator or allocator-aware container. –  Billy ONeal Dec 9 '12 at 8:20
    
I believe the intent is to prevent concurrency issues arising from delaying one thread's deallocation (which is just a memory write) past the other thread's allocation. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 9 '12 at 8:37
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.