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I have created some sample ViewModel to test usage of DPs with asyncCtp:

public class SampleVm : DependencyObject
{

    public static readonly DependencyProperty SampleDependencyPropertyProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("SampleDependencyProperty", typeof (int), typeof (SampleVm), new PropertyMetadata(default(int)));

    public int SampleDependencyProperty
    {
        get { return (int) GetValue(SampleDependencyPropertyProperty); }
        set { SetValue(SampleDependencyPropertyProperty, value); }
    }
    public ISampleModel _model;
    public SampleVm(ISampleModel model)
    {
        _model = model;
    }

    public async Task SetDependencyProperty()
    {
        var modelData = await TaskEx.Run(() => _model.GetSomeIntegerValue());
        SampleDependencyProperty = modelData;
    }
}

and the model which injected to ViewModel is:

public interface ISampleModel
{
    int GetSomeIntegerValue();
}

public class SampleModel : ISampleModel
{
    public int GetSomeIntegerValue()
    {
        return 10;
    }
}

when I run the WPF application there is no problem, but when I want to test it with the following code:

[Fact]
public async Task CheckValueSetting()
{
    var model = new Mock<ISampleModel>();
    model.Setup(x => x.GetSomeIntegerValue()).Returns(5);
    var viewModel =new SampleVm(model.Object);

    await viewModel.SetDependencyProperty();

    Assert.Equal(5, viewModel.SampleDependencyProperty);
}

I got the following error:

System.InvalidOperationException: The calling thread cannot access this object because a different thread owns it.

Server stack trace: 

    at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.VerifyAccess()
    at System.Windows.DependencyObject.SetValue(DependencyProperty dp, Object value)
    at WpfApplication4.SampleVm.set_SampleDependencyProperty(Int32 value) in SampleVM.cs: line 19
    at WpfApplication4.SampleVm.<SetDependencyProperty>d__1.MoveNext() in SampleVM.cs: line 30

    Exception rethrown at [0]: 
    at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter.ThrowForNonSuccess(Task task)
    at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter.GetResult()
    at WpfApplication4.SampleVmFixture.<CheckValueSetting>d__0.MoveNext() in SampleVmFixture.cs: line 16 

so what is the solution?

share|improve this question
    
Can I check: why are you still using the async CTP? Isn't that all in core .NET now? –  Marc Gravell Dec 9 '12 at 11:47
    
I have to use .Net framework 4 because of the restrictions in the company. –  mehdi.loa Dec 9 '12 at 12:45
    
that makes precisely no sense. By definition a CTP is completely unsupported, and in this case is now obsolete. There is no universe where using a CTP is a better option than facing the upgrade. IMO: take the upgrade (even if that means some work internally), or forget about async. Finally: much of the async stuff is in 4.0 anyway!!! –  Marc Gravell Dec 9 '12 at 13:34
    
Targeting .NET 4 makes sense, particularly since the "in-place" 4.5 upgrade doesn't support XP. He probably just doesn't know about Microsoft.Bcl.Async. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 9 '12 at 13:39
    
thanks to @MarcGravell and StephenCleary for their suggestions. after reading this question and this blog on MSDN I think the solution is not to continue with AsyncCtp. –  mehdi.loa Dec 9 '12 at 15:23
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, I recommend that you upgrade to VS2012 with the Microsoft.Bcl.Async package. This will enable you to target .NET 4.0 with the newest tools. The Async CTP has known bugs that will not be fixed, and it has installation issues (that won't be fixed) that will make setting up new development machines quite difficult.

But before you delete the Async CTP, check out your (C# Testing) Unit Testing directory under the Async CTP directory. You'll find several types to help with unit testing, such as GeneralThreadAffineContext:

[Fact]
public async Task CheckValueSetting()
{
    var model = new Mock<ISampleModel>();
    model.Setup(x => x.GetSomeIntegerValue()).Returns(5);
    SampleVm viewModel;
    await GeneralThreadAffineContext.Run(async () =>
    {
        viewModel = new SampleVm(model.Object);
        await viewModel.SetDependencyProperty();
    });

    Assert.Equal(5, viewModel.SampleDependencyProperty);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The example from the CTP is not available elsewhere? Also, I think you forgot to await the result of Run(). –  svick Dec 9 '12 at 17:26
    
I'm not aware of an official source for the "extras" from the Async CTP; AsyncContext in my AsyncEx library is a pretty close match for GeneralThreadAffineContext, but I'm not aware of anything equivalent to WindowsFormsContext or WpfContext. Also, Run returns void (it does not complete until all async methods have completed). –  Stephen Cleary Dec 9 '12 at 21:25
    
The GeneralThreadAffineContext I have has several overloads of Run(): void Run(Action asyncAction) and Task Run(Func<Task> asyncMethod) and since you're using the second one, I think you have to await it. –  svick Dec 9 '12 at 23:51
    
@svick: You are correct; I had modified my copy. Technically, that Run overload will wait for the async method to complete, but there's no harm in awaiting it. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 10 '12 at 1:00
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