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FYI: My question is duplicate of this MySQL question, but intended for SQL Server

Is there a function to write a query that will return a list of days between two dates?

For example, lets say there is a function called ExplodeDates:

SELECT ExplodeDates('2010-01-01', '2010-01-13');

This would return a single column table with the values:

2010-01-01
2010-01-02
2010-01-03
2010-01-04
2010-01-05
2010-01-06
2010-01-07
2010-01-08
2010-01-09
2010-01-10
2010-01-11
2010-01-12
2010-01-13

Many thanks

Edit: I'm thinking that a calendar/numbers table might be able to help me here...

Update I decided to have a look at the three code answers provided, and the results of the execution - as a % of the total batch - are:

Rob Farley's answer : 18%

StingyJack's answer : 41%

KM's answer : 41%

Lower is better

I have accepted Rob Farley's answer, as it was the fastest, even though numbers table solutions (used by both KM and StingyJack in their answers) are something of a favourite of mine. Rob Farley's was two-thirds faster.

share|improve this question
    
Looping performance in SQL is going to S U C K. Please keep that in mind when trying out these answers. –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 12:31
3  
What about exec time? % of total batch is used to identify a bottleneck, not throughput. Are you benchmarking the actual function call or everything else with it? Comparing the results of small and large batches? –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 15:49
1  
using SET STATISTICS TIME ON all three functoions called with ('1/1/1998','12/31/2020') report back the same CPU time = 0 ms, elapsed time = 1 ms. When calling Rob's and mine with ('1/1/1900','1921-11-27'), StingyJacks can't do that date range I get Rob's as: CPU time = 93 ms, elapsed time = 93 ms. and I get mine: CPU time = 0 ms, elapsed time = 1 ms., mine looks way better. What testing method do you use @Dan Atkinson? if you included the one time Number table set-up, that is a VERY FLAWED way, as it does not reflect the actual in-use perfomrance. –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 17:05
    
@KM and @StingyJack. Thank you both for educating me on the correct way to benchmark. And KM, thank you for going to the trouble to point out the actual benchmark results. I will run some on my db and update the question accordingly. Thanks again! –  Dan Atkinson Sep 4 '09 at 19:23

13 Answers 13

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Try something like this:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ExplodeDates(@startdate datetime, @enddate datetime)
returns table as
return (
with 
 N0 as (SELECT 1 as n UNION ALL SELECT 1)
,N1 as (SELECT 1 as n FROM N0 t1, N0 t2)
,N2 as (SELECT 1 as n FROM N1 t1, N1 t2)
,N3 as (SELECT 1 as n FROM N2 t1, N2 t2)
,N4 as (SELECT 1 as n FROM N3 t1, N3 t2)
,N5 as (SELECT 1 as n FROM N4 t1, N4 t2)
,N6 as (SELECT 1 as n FROM N5 t1, N5 t2)
,nums as (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT 1)) as num FROM N6)
SELECT DATEADD(day,num-1,@startdate) as thedate
FROM nums
WHERE num <= DATEDIFF(day,@startdate,@enddate) + 1
);

You then use:

SELECT *
FROM dbo.ExplodeDates('20090401','20090531') as d;

Edited (after the acceptance):

Please note... if you already have a sufficiently large nums table then you should use:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ExplodeDates(@startdate datetime, @enddate datetime)
returns table as
return (
SELECT DATEADD(day,num-1,@startdate) as thedate
FROM nums
WHERE num <= DATEDIFF(day,@startdate,@enddate) + 1
);

And you can create such a table using:

CREATE TABLE dbo.nums (num int PRIMARY KEY);
INSERT dbo.nums values (1);
GO
INSERT dbo.nums SELECT num + (SELECT COUNT(*) FROM nums) FROM nums
GO 20

These lines will create a table of numbers containing 1M rows... and far quicker than inserting them one by one.

You should NOT create your ExplodeDates function using a function that involves BEGIN and END, as the Query Optimizer becomes unable to simplify the query at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for taking the time to improve your answer. I also wasn't aware that using BEGIN and END prevents Query Optimizer from doing its job. Thanks! –  Dan Atkinson Sep 5 '09 at 10:57
1  
If I could vote this up more than once I would - the performance of it is phenomenal. I tested it against a simple version where nums is a table of numbers, with a clustered index on the number. Where the date difference is 2 days, the CTE beats the clustered index by a factor of over 2 (28% vs 72%), but if the date difference is 37 years then the CTE version is 3% vs 97% for the table! I wish I knew why it was so quick... –  Jonathan Sayce Sep 1 '11 at 12:56
    
It's because it's not having to do any I/O. –  Rob Farley Sep 3 '11 at 12:29
    
You really rock.... –  Giannis Paraskevopoulos Nov 7 '13 at 8:31

this few lines are the simple answer for this question in sql server.

WITH mycte AS
(
  SELECT CAST('2011-01-01' AS DATETIME) DateValue
  UNION ALL
  SELECT  DateValue + 1
  FROM    mycte   
  WHERE   DateValue + 1 < '2021-12-31'
)

SELECT  DateValue
FROM    mycte
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0)
share|improve this answer
5  
This is the correct answer. –  Steve Konves Oct 16 '12 at 21:55
    
nice!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! –  Ev. Aug 7 '13 at 5:51

This does exactly what you want, modified from Will's earlier post. No need for helper tables or loops.

WITH date_range (calc_date) AS (
    SELECT DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, '2010-01-13') - DATEDIFF(DAY, '2010-01-01', '2010-01-13'), 0)
        UNION ALL SELECT DATEADD(DAY, 1, calc_date)
            FROM date_range
            WHERE DATEADD(DAY, 1, calc_date) <= '2010-01-13')
SELECT calc_date
FROM date_range;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Nice query. Here's a working link: sqlfiddle.com/#!3/d41d8/5475 –  w0lf Oct 22 '12 at 19:59
1  
I get the following error on more complex date sets: The statement terminated. The maximum recursion 100 has been exhausted before statement completion. So, I should point out for others who wish to use this answer on large ranges that you will need to add a maxrecursion value - OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0). –  Dan Atkinson Oct 23 '12 at 8:41

I'm an oracle guy, but I believe MS SQL Server has support for the connect by clause:

select  sysdate + level
from    dual
connect by level <= 10 ;

The output is:

SYSDATE+LEVEL
05-SEP-09
06-SEP-09
07-SEP-09
08-SEP-09
09-SEP-09
10-SEP-09
11-SEP-09
12-SEP-09
13-SEP-09
14-SEP-09

Dual is just a 'dummy' table that comes with oracle (it contains 1 row and the word 'dummy' as the value of the single column).

share|improve this answer
    
SQL Server doesn't have a built in table "dual", you need to create your own, like I do in my example code. I think "sysdate" is GETDATE() in SQL Server, and "connect by" is not valid syntax. –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 11:43
    
Thus you might also SELECT from nowhere in SQL Server. SELECT GETDATE() is a valid line of code in SQL Server, not in Oracle, even though you replace the GETDATE() function by its SYSDATE homologue. –  Will Marcouiller Sep 4 '09 at 11:48
    
You're right Brian, in Oracle we would do it this way. There are much interesting features in Oracle and PL/SQL that are not contained in TSQL and SQL Server. this is Sybase's fault! ;-) SQL Server is primarly based on Sysbase TSQL language. –  Will Marcouiller Sep 4 '09 at 11:49
    
SELECT GETDATE() will not produce a set only a single row. using dual in Oracle, you get a set. –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 11:54
    
A single row is still a set. –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 12:29

A few ideas:

If you need the list dates in order to loop through them, you could have a Start Date and Day Count parameters and do a while loop whilst creating the date and using it?

Use C# CLR Stored Procedures and write the code in C#

Do this outside the database in code

share|improve this answer
    
CLR Stored proc is def the way to go if performance is critical. –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 11:59
    
@StingyJack, no way. a Numbers table would be much more efficient, see my answer for an example of how. –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 12:34
    
Performance is not critical, as this would only be called once an hour at worst, and on average, once a day, and then it's cached. I don't want to use a CLR to do this though. –  Dan Atkinson Sep 4 '09 at 13:30
    
@KM - at risk of starting a flame war here, you should know that SQL is not designed to handle procedural ops, and performs poorly with them. If you need to do something like that, its best handled by application code. –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 13:39
    
@StingyJack, how is my function procedural? other than the validation check, it is a simple query that adding an offset to a fixed date for a viariable number of rows. Its not much different that caluclations done on in item details, like calculating total price based on qty and unit price with or without a currency. –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 14:35

Before you use my function, you need to set up a "helper" table, you only need to do this one time per database:

CREATE TABLE Numbers
(Number int  NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_Numbers PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (Number ASC)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
DECLARE @x int
SET @x=0
WHILE @x<8000
BEGIN
    SET @x=@x+1
    INSERT INTO Numbers VALUES (@x)
END

here is the function:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ListDates
(
     @StartDate    char(10)  
    ,@EndDate      char(10)
)
RETURNS
@DateList table
(
    Date datetime
)
AS
BEGIN


IF ISDATE(@StartDate)!=1 OR ISDATE(@EndDate)!=1
BEGIN
    RETURN
END

INSERT INTO @DateList
        (Date)
    SELECT
        CONVERT(datetime,@StartDate)+n.Number-1
        FROM Numbers  n
        WHERE Number<=DATEDIFF(day,@StartDate,CONVERT(datetime,@EndDate)+1)


RETURN

END --Function

use this:

select * from dbo.ListDates('2010-01-01', '2010-01-13')

output:

Date
-----------------------
2010-01-01 00:00:00.000
2010-01-02 00:00:00.000
2010-01-03 00:00:00.000
2010-01-04 00:00:00.000
2010-01-05 00:00:00.000
2010-01-06 00:00:00.000
2010-01-07 00:00:00.000
2010-01-08 00:00:00.000
2010-01-09 00:00:00.000
2010-01-10 00:00:00.000
2010-01-11 00:00:00.000
2010-01-12 00:00:00.000
2010-01-13 00:00:00.000

(13 row(s) affected)
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for using loops –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 12:00
    
Where there's a "WHILE" there's a loop! –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 12:28
4  
@StingyJack, are you nuts, there is no loop in my function. I use a loop to set up the Numbers table so people can easily see what it does. I could easily use a CTE there (like from here: sommarskog.se/arrays-in-sql-2005.html#tblnum), but it confuses some people. For a one time set-up of a table it is not an issue. –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 12:30
1  
He's refering to where you input values into your Numbers table. –  Mr. Smith Sep 4 '09 at 12:31
1  
I love the idea of numbers tables! They're ridiculously versatile and can be used for other things as well. –  Dan Atkinson Sep 4 '09 at 14:20

Would all these dates be in the database already or do you just want to know the days between the two dates? If it's the first you could use the BETWEEN or <= >= to find the dates between

EXAMPLE:

SELECT column_name(s)
FROM table_name
WHERE column_name
BETWEEN value1 AND value2

OR

SELECT column_name(s)
FROM table_name
WHERE column_name
value1 >= column_name
AND column_name =< value2
share|improve this answer

Perhaps if you wish to go an easier way, this should do it.

WITH date_range (calc_date) AS (
    SELECT DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) - 6, 0)
        UNION ALL SELECT DATEADD(DAY, 1, calc_date)
            FROM date_range
            WHERE DATEADD(DAY, 1, calc_date) < CURRENT_TIMESTAMP)
SELECT calc_date
FROM date_range;

But the temporary table is a very good approach also. Perhaps shall you also consider a populated calendar table.

share|improve this answer
    
You only have to create a stored procedure with this code, and perhaps replace the CURRENT_TIMESTAMP values with yours or something like this. –  Will Marcouiller Sep 4 '09 at 12:24

All you have to do is just change the hard coded value in the code provided below

DECLARE @firstDate datetime
    DECLARE @secondDate datetime
    DECLARE @totalDays  INT
    SELECT @firstDate = getDate() - 30
    SELECT @secondDate = getDate()

    DECLARE @index INT
    SELECT @index = 0
    SELECT @totalDays = datediff(day, @firstDate, @secondDate)

    CREATE TABLE #temp
    (
         ID INT NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1)
        ,CommonDate DATETIME NULL
    )

    WHILE @index < @totalDays
        BEGIN

            INSERT INTO #temp (CommonDate) VALUES  (DATEADD(Day, @index, @firstDate))   
            SELECT @index = @index + 1
        END

    SELECT CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), CommonDate, 102) as [Date Between] FROM #temp

    DROP TABLE #temp
share|improve this answer

Definately a numbers table, though tyou may want to use Mark Redman's idea of a CLR proc/assembly if you really need the performance.

How to create the table of dates (and a super fast way to create a numbers table)

/*Gets a list of integers into a temp table (Jeff Moden's idea from SqlServerCentral.com)*/
 SELECT TOP 10950 /*30 years of days*/
        IDENTITY(INT,1,1) as N
   INTO #Numbers
   FROM Master.dbo.SysColumns sc1,
        Master.dbo.SysColumns sc2


/*Create the dates table*/
CREATE TABLE [TableOfDates](
    [fld_date] [datetime] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_TableOfDates] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [fld_date] ASC
)WITH FILLFACTOR = 99 ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

/*fill the table with dates*/
DECLARE @daysFromFirstDateInTheTable int
DECLARE @firstDateInTheTable DATETIME

SET @firstDateInTheTable = '01/01/1998'
SET @daysFromFirstDateInTheTable = (SELECT (DATEDIFF(dd, @firstDateInTheTable ,GETDATE()) + 1))

INSERT INTO
      TableOfDates
SELECT 
      DATEADD(dd,nums.n - @daysFromFirstDateInTheTable, CAST(FLOOR(CAST(GETDATE() as FLOAT)) as DateTime)) as FLD_Date
FROM #Numbers nums

Now that you have a table of dates, you can use a function (NOT A PROC) like KM's to get the table of them.

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.ListDates
(
     @StartDate    DATETIME  
    ,@EndDate      DATETIME
)
RETURNS
@DateList table
(
    Date datetime
)
AS
BEGIN

/*add some validation logic of your own to make sure that the inputs are sound.Adjust the rest as needed*/

  INSERT INTO
    @DateList
  SELECT FLD_Date FROM TableOfDates (NOLOCK) WHERE FLD_Date >= @StartDate AND FLD_Date <= @EndDate
  RETURN
END
share|improve this answer
    
why do you need a table of dates, you just calculate them using your Numbers table?? –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 12:36
    
because calculating them on the fly can cause poor performance, especially if they are used inline and evaluated for each row accessed by the statement. –  StingyJack Sep 4 '09 at 13:37
    
Msg 137, Level 15, State 2, Line 23 Must declare the scalar variable "@". this (SELECT (DATEDIFF(dd, @ firstDateInTheTable ,GETDATE()) + 1)) should be (SELECT (DATEDIFF(dd, @firstDateInTheTable ,GETDATE()) + 1))_ –  KM. Sep 4 '09 at 14:30
WITH TEMP (DIA, SIGUIENTE_DIA ) AS
           (SELECT 
               1, 
               CAST(@FECHAINI AS DATE)
            FROM 
               DUAL
           UNION ALL
            SELECT 
               DIA, 
               DATEADD(DAY, DIA, SIGUIENTE_DIA)
            FROM 
               TEMP
            WHERE
               DIA < DATEDIFF(DAY,  @FECHAINI, @FECHAFIN)   
               AND DATEADD(DAY, 1, SIGUIENTE_DIA) <=  CAST(@FECHAFIN AS DATE)
           )
           SELECT 
              SIGUIENTE_DIA AS CALENDARIO 
           FROM
              TEMP
           ORDER BY   
              SIGUIENTE_DIA

The detail is on the table DUAL but if your exchange this table for a dummy table this works.

share|improve this answer
SELECT  dateadd(dd,DAYS,'2013-09-07 00:00:00') DATES
INTO        #TEMP1
FROM
(SELECT TOP 365 colorder - 1 AS DAYS from master..syscolumns 
    WHERE id = -519536829 order by colorder) a

WHERE datediff(dd,dateadd(dd,DAYS,'2013-09-07 00:00:00'),'2013-09-13 00:00:00' ) >= 0 
    AND  dateadd(dd,DAYS,'2013-09-07 00:00:00') <=  '2013-09-13 00:00:00'  
    SELECT * FROM #TEMP1
share|improve this answer
    
Could you provide an explanation along with the example? –  Steven Westbrook Oct 4 '13 at 13:54

Answer is avialbe here How to list all dates between two dates

Create Procedure SelectDates(@fromDate Date, @toDate Date)
AS
BEGIN
    SELECT DATEADD(DAY,number,@fromDate) [Date]
    FROM master..spt_values
    WHERE type = 'P'
    AND DATEADD(DAY,number,@fromDate) < @toDate

END
share|improve this answer
    
This is not a good answer for several reasons. 1: Master table isn't always available. 2: The table is only as long as the number of items in your database. If this is less than the actual answer, then the returned list of this proc will be incorrect. 3: The answer is, more or less, a numbers table which uses a system table. –  Dan Atkinson Jun 23 at 10:07

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