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Please don't treat this below question as a duplicate one..!

I have developed a class that lets multi-threads to run sequentially, one at a time and in order. All the application code between this class' claimAccess function and release Access function will be executed only in one thread at one time. All other threads will wait in the queue until the previous thread completed. now Please advise can this same thing be achieved by some other means like executor, cycle barrier or countdown latch also..!!Please suggest how this can be build by other approach

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class AccessGate {
    protected boolean shouldWait = false;
    protected final List waitThreadQueue = new ArrayList();

    /**
     * For a thread to determine if it should wait. It it is, the thread will
     * wait until notified.
     * 
     */
    public void claimAccess() {
        final Thread thread = getWaitThread();
        if (thread != null) {
            // let the thread wait untill notified
            synchronized (thread) {
                try {
                    thread.wait();
                } catch (InterruptedException exp) {
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * For a thread to determine if it should wait. It it is, the thread will be
     * put into the waitThreadQueue to wait.
     * 
     */
    private synchronized Thread getWaitThread() {
        Thread thread = null;
        if (shouldWait || !waitThreadQueue.isEmpty()) {
            thread = Thread.currentThread();
            waitThreadQueue.add(thread);
        }
        shouldWait = true;
        return thread;
    }

    /**
     * Release the thread in the first position of the waitThreadQueue.
     * 
     */
    public synchronized void releaseAccess() {
        if (waitThreadQueue.isEmpty()) {
            shouldWait = false;
        } else {
            shouldWait = true;
            // give the claimAccess function a little time to complete
            try {
                Thread.sleep(10);
            } catch (InterruptedException exp) {
            }

            // release the waiting thread
            final Thread thread = (Thread) waitThreadQueue.remove(0);
            synchronized (thread) {
                thread.notifyAll();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
does ordering of tasks matter? –  Narendra Pathai Dec 9 '12 at 9:14
    
@NarendraPathai yeah have to maintain the order –  user1881169 Dec 9 '12 at 9:46
    
What about Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor()? –  Philipp Reichart Dec 9 '12 at 13:39
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2 Answers

This is by means of ExecutorService

Executors.singleThreadExecutor() will execute a single task at a time and will do it sequentially.

Creates an Executor that uses a single worker thread operating off an unbounded queue. (Note however that if this single thread terminates due to a failure during execution prior to shutdown, a new one will take its place if needed to execute subsequent tasks.) Tasks are guaranteed to execute sequentially, and no more than one task will be active at any given time.

share|improve this answer
    
could you please post the updated code as I have done that will help more to understand, Thanks –  user1881169 Dec 9 '12 at 9:47
1  
@user1881169 you should first try by yourself and then if there is some problem you can always ask again. :) We are here to help. –  Narendra Pathai Dec 9 '12 at 11:01
    
Thanks but I am unable to achieve that If you could please post the updated code it will be a great help,Thanks in advance –  user1881169 Dec 10 '12 at 14:29
    
This would help tutorials.jenkov.com/java-util-concurrent/executorservice.html. If still you are not able to get post the updated code of yours and will help :) –  Narendra Pathai Dec 10 '12 at 15:35
    
I have gone through but could not understand completely , Please help me as I am stuck up,I have to convert the above approach through executors and I am stuck up completely,Thanks in advance –  user1881169 Dec 10 '12 at 17:31
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Yes, there are simpler ways to do this. The very simplest is just using a monitor, with no waiting, sleeping, or any other shenanigans:

// somewhere visible
public final Object accessGate = new Object();

// in your application code
synchronized (accessGate) {
    // this block will be executed only in one thread at one time
}

Java's built-in monitors provide pretty much the semantics you need. The only problem is that order in which threads get to hold the lock isn't guaranteed; that's down to how the underlying operating system handles ordering on locks (semaphores or mutexes or whatever). The operating system may well guarantee the behaviour you need, but this isn't generally portable.

If you need a portable guarantee of ordering, you have a few choices. The most obvious is a ReentrantLock with fairness set to true:

// somewhere visible
public final Lock accessGate = new ReentrantLock(true);

// in your application code
accessGate.lock();
try {
    // this block will be executed only in one thread at one time
}
finally {
    accessGate.unlock();
}

Another is a Semaphore with a single permit and fairness set to true:

// somewhere visible
public final Semaphore accessGate = new Semaphore(1, true);

// in your application code
accessGate.acquire();
try {
    // this block will be executed only in one thread at one time
}
finally {
    accessGate.release();
}

These two have very similar behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
@TomAnderson..Thanks a lot , the two approaches that you have suggested are really helpful could you please post the complete updated code as I have done..that will help more to understand –  user1881169 Dec 9 '12 at 10:31
    
could you please post the complete code, Thanks –  user1881169 Dec 9 '12 at 10:52
    
Above code wont guarantee the ordering! But question mentions that ordering is to be maintained –  Narendra Pathai Dec 9 '12 at 10:57
    
@user1881169: No, i won't post the complete code. I have given you the information you need to solve this problem; it's now down to you as a programmer to make use of it. –  Tom Anderson Dec 9 '12 at 11:05
    
@NarendraPathai: The approach using synchronized might not preserve the order, but the approaches using ReentrantLock and Semaphore do preserve the order, because they use them constructed with fairness. The javadocs i link to give more information. –  Tom Anderson Dec 9 '12 at 11:07
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