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I'd like to plot what Excel calls an "Exponential Trend/Regression" on a stock chart. When I run the code below in the IPython notebook it simply says "The kernel has died, would you like to restart it?". Any ideas on how to fix it? Also, this is just attempting to do a linear regression and I'm not quite sure how to do a regression on exponential data.

import datetime
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import statsmodels.api as sm
from pandas.io.data import DataReader

sp500 = DataReader("AGG", "yahoo", start=datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1)) # returns a DataFrame
sp500["regression"] = sm.OLS(sp500["Adj Close"], sp500.index).fit().fittedvalues()
top = plt.subplot2grid((3,1), (0, 0), rowspan=2)
top.plot(sp500.index, sp500["Adj Close"], 'b-', sp500.index, sp500["regression"], 'r-')
bottom = plt.subplot2grid((3,1), (2,0))
bottom.bar(sp500.index, sp500.Volume)
plt.gcf().set_size_inches(18,8)
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With ipython --pylab there is a segmentation fault –  bmu Dec 9 '12 at 11:40
    
To the segmentation fault (see also second answer): this is caused by a bug in the dot function in numpy 1.6.2, which is the version where datetime arrays were added and where there were still some problems. This has been fixed in the beta version for numpy 1.7.0. The message, that I take from this, is that we should be careful with how we use datetime arrays until the numpy support for this new feature has lost its sharp corners. –  user333700 Dec 11 '12 at 3:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I took another look at this and realized that my previous answer fit poorly since it didn't include an intercept. I've updated my answer.

The segfault comes from trying to us the Datetime index as the exogenous variable. Instead try:

import datetime
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import statsmodels.api as sm
import pandas
from pandas.io.data import DataReader

sp500 = DataReader("AGG", "yahoo", start=datetime.datetime(2000, 1, 1)) # returns a DataFrame
sp500["regression"] = sm.OLS(sp500["Adj Close"],
    sm.add_constant(range(len(sp500.index)),
    prepend=True)).fit().fittedvalues

Notice that you don't need to call statsmodels' fittedvalues as a function. If your data points are all equally space this model will give the same results as using the actual index.

For your second question, pandas as a built in exponentially weighted moving average that you may want to look in to: pandas.ewma here.

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Welcome to StackOverflow! +1 for pandas's ewma –  Andy Hayden Dec 9 '12 at 13:11
    
Thanks for the help. I actually do want a regression and not a moving average if you have any ideas on that. –  Ben McCann Dec 9 '12 at 22:21
    
Think I figured out the second part: sp500["regression"] = exp(sm.OLS(log(sp500["Adj Close"]), sm.add_constant(range(len(sp500.index)), prepend=True)).fit().fittedvalues) –  Ben McCann Dec 9 '12 at 22:45

You're going to need to post more information - version numbers and how you built pandas - maybe a traceback would also help narrow things down. I am unable to replicate a segfault with pandas 0.9.1 on 64-bit linux in IPython with or without pylab. You might also want to report bugs on github issues rather than stack overflow. Easier to get developers' attentions there.

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I'm also not able to replicate. –  Wes McKinney Dec 10 '12 at 15:04
    
I get a segfault with 0.9.1 64bit –  bmu Dec 10 '12 at 18:25
    
I opened issue 586 (I created the statsmodels tag, so maybe it is my fault, that it is reported here ;-(). –  bmu Dec 10 '12 at 19:24
    
I'm on Ubuntu 12.04 and used pip to install everything. Here are my version numbers: ipython==0.13.1, numpy==1.6.2, pandas==0.9.1, scipy==0.11.0, statsmodels==0.5.0, tables==2.4.0 –  Ben McCann Dec 10 '12 at 22:59

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