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public class Test1 {
    static final int i;
    static{
        if(3<2){
        i = 0;
        }
    }   
}
public class Test2 {
    static final int i;
    static{
        if(3>2){
        i = 0;
        }
    }   
}

Class Test1 failed to compile, Class Test2 compiled successfully.

Can any body tell me how compiler is able to evaluate expression in if condition?

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4 Answers 4

static final int i;

need to be initialized at static initializer, because it is final.

static{
        if(3<2){
        i = 0;
        }
    }

because of the 3<2 literal or constant, the compiler was able to detect your dead part of the code and do not initialize the i.

add an else case and do some i initialization there.

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It has to do with how the compiler determines if a statement will be executed or not. It is defined in the JLS #16:

Each local variable and every blank final field must have a definitely assigned value when any access of its value occurs.

In your example, the compiler can determine that i is (or is not) definitely assigned at compile time because the expression in the if is a constant expression.

JLS #15.28 defines constant expressions:

A compile-time constant expression is an expression denoting a value of primitive type or a String that does not complete abruptly and is composed using only the following:

  • Literals of primitive type [...]
  • The relational operators <, <=, >, and >= [...]

Interestingly, this modified version of Test2 does not compile although Test2 does compile:

static class Test3 {
    static final int i;
    static {
        int j = 3;
        if (j > 2) {
            i = 0;
        }
    }
}

The reason is that j > 2 is not a constant expression any longer. Making j final would make the class compile again.

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According to Java Language Specification the expression in the condition parts of your if statements are compile-time expressions. In Test1 compiler knows that i will never be initialized, that's why it complains. In the second case the compiler knows that i will be initialized. If you replace your compile-time expressions with something more dynamic, both classes will fail to compile because compiler will not be able to guarantee that i is initialized.

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if (3<2) can be optimised to if (false) hence Java compilation detects an unreachable statement (error).

if (3>2) can be optimised to if (true) and the enclosed statement is then always executed. No problem with that.

The compiler can easily detect that these are constant scalars and hence can evaluate (i.e. optimise) the expression at compile time. We would expect nothing less from a decent compiler.

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