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  in.open(filename.c_str(), ifstream::in);
  string name, email, group;
  while (in >> name >> email >> group) {
    in >> name >> email >> group;
    cout << name << email << group);
    ...
  }
  in.close();

Consider this code where in is of type ifstream and filename is the name of the file from which we read the data. Format of input file is perfectly fine - many lines with 3 string in each. This piece should simply print all of the data in the file but what id does is printing all of the lines except for the first line. Why is the first line skipped?

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Why are you reading name, email and group twice in a row? (In the while condition then again in the while body.) –  Mat Dec 9 '12 at 10:24
    
You're reading twice for every output. –  chris Dec 9 '12 at 10:25
3  
I'm actually surprised it's not skipping every other line, since you are apparently reading two lines per loop but only printing one. –  Andrei Tita Dec 9 '12 at 10:25
    
I beg to differ that it's only the first line not read: stacked-crooked.com/view?id=424134b9d0a3000d6425bd8028a1fa77 –  chris Dec 9 '12 at 10:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Drop in >> name >> email >> group; from the body of the loop. The one in the condition is enough.

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I see, totally my fault. I copied this piece of code several times and this line doubled. Thanks a lot! –  Sergey Dec 9 '12 at 10:26

You're reading too much.

while (in >> name >> email >> group)

Already reads the data once, the next line reads it again, overwriting your data. Get rid of the repetition and your cout should work just fine.

in.open(filename.c_str(), ifstream::in);
string name, email, group;
while (in >> name >> email >> group) {    //Reads the data into the variables
    cout << name << email << group;        //Outputs the variables.
    ...
}
in.close();
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Consider this line:

while (in >> name >> email >> group) {

each time the program hits this line, it executes the code inside the brackets. In this case, 'in' is read and populates name, email, group even before actually entering the body of the loop.

Thus, when the body of the loop is executed, the first line has already been read.

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If you strings are not seperated by new line operator in the input file use code the blow to read it.

  ifstream in;
  in.open("urfile.txt",ios::beg);
  string name, email, group;
  while (in.good()) {
    in >> name >> email >> group;
    cout << name << email << group;
  }
  in.close();
share|improve this answer
    
this in.open("urfile.txt",ios::beg); means start reading file from the start of file –  Amir Qayyum Khan Dec 9 '12 at 10:42
    
while (in.good()) mean read unless file is end –  Amir Qayyum Khan Dec 9 '12 at 10:44

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