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Here's what I'm trying to do:

template <typename T> struct Model
{
    vector<T> vertices ;

    #if T has a .normal member
    void transform( Matrix m )
    {
        each vertex in vertices
        {
          vertex.pos = m * vertex.pos ;
          vertex.normal = m * vertex.normal ;
        }
    }
    #endif

    #if T has NO .normal member
    void transform( Matrix m )
    {
        each vertex in vertices
        {
          vertex.pos = m * vertex.pos ;
        }
    }
    #endif
} ;

I've seen examples of using enable_if, but I cannot understand how to apply enable_if to this problem, or if it even can be applied.

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1  
enable_if is not used to check if a member exists, rather it is used to remove overloads. –  Pubby Dec 9 '12 at 11:15
    
Can't I use it to do something like (suggestion in edit above)? –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 11:24
    
No, you're wanting a static if which doesn't exist yet. What you want is completely possible, it just won't use syntax like that. –  Pubby Dec 9 '12 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

This has become way easier with C++11.

template <typename T> struct Model
{
    vector<T> vertices;

    void transform( Matrix m )
    {
        for(auto &&vertex : vertices)
        {
          vertex.pos = m * vertex.pos;
          modifyNormal(vertex, m, special_());
        }
    }

private:

    struct general_ {};
    struct special_ : general_ {};
    template<typename> struct int_ { typedef int type; };

    template<typename Lhs, typename Rhs,
             typename int_<decltype(Lhs::normal)>::type = 0>
    void modifyNormal(Lhs &&lhs, Rhs &&rhs, special_) {
       lhs.normal = rhs * lhs.normal;
    }

    template<typename Lhs, typename Rhs>
    void modifyNormal(Lhs &&lhs, Rhs &&rhs, general_) {
       // do nothing
    }
};

Things to note:

  • You can name non-static data members in decltype and sizeof without needing an object.
  • You can apply extended SFINAE. Basically any expression can be checked and if it is not valid when the arguments are substituted, the template is ignored.
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That is definitely much better SFINAE than before, where you had to create a member detector for each member type you want to detect. But why do people always jump to SFINAE, I prefer to use type traits to do this type of conditional compilation now. –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 13:12
    
I guess that depends on whether you have more types to check or more members to check? –  Dalibor Frivaldsky Aug 1 '14 at 17:42

You need a meta function to detect your member so that you can use enable_if. The idiom to do this is called Member Detector. It's a bit tricky, but it can be done!

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