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I have a file named "config.php" which contains a variable named $unit_names. In a class I have the following method which returns unit name by it's id. I use this method for all rows in a table, but the problem is config.php is included only in the first call to the method. next calls cause the notice: undefined variable $unit_names...

If I replace include_once by include the notice disappears. But why? include_once should load the config.php file.

public function get_unit_name($unit_id) 
    {   
            include_once("config.php");
            return $unit_names[$unit_id];
    }   
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by tereško, Mr. Alien, HamZa, StaticVariable, Jocelyn May 18 '13 at 11:10

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
but the problem is config.php is included only in the first call to the method But that sounds like include_one is doing exactly what it's supposed to do, doesn't it? – Pekka 웃 Dec 9 '12 at 11:24
    
I have an idea but you need to post more (other occurences of include_once, anything in between, contents of config.php). – Jan Dvorak Dec 9 '12 at 11:24
1  
Wouldn't it make more sense to put the include_once outside the function? – Ian Roberts Dec 9 '12 at 11:28
    
You have a singular in the notice (undefined variable $unit_name), and a plural ($unit_names) in the code. Is that a typo? – lortabac Dec 9 '12 at 11:30
    
@JanDvorak config.php has just the variable unit_names. there is no function or class – user16948 Dec 9 '12 at 11:30
up vote 6 down vote accepted

include_once will not load the specified file at least once, it will load it exactly once! If you call the function the second time, the file has already been included and will therefore not be included again, hence the error message.

The idea with this is that you use include_once / require_once when you include files that contain function or class definitions, i.e., files that would produce an error if they were loaded more than once. If it's okay to load a file twice or more times, always use include() instead of include_once().

Consider something like this instead (to save the cost of re-including the file every time):

private $unit_names = null;

public function get_unit_name($unit_id) {   
    if ($this->unit_names === null) {
        include("config.php");
        $this->unit_names = $unit_names;
    }

    return $this->unit_names[$unit_id];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok. but if the file has already been included why do I get this notice? if it has been included, the variable should be available – user16948 Dec 9 '12 at 11:27
1  
The first time you make a call to "get_unit_name()", the include_once() statement gets replaced by the content of the specified file (that obviously contains the declaration of $unit_name, so everything is fine). The second time, however, PHP evaluates the include_once() statement again and notices that the file has already been included and shall therefore not be included again (because the _once edition was used) - for this second call, the include statement will therefore be just ignored, or "removed". – Niko Dec 9 '12 at 11:32
    
...and notices that the file has already been included So if it has already been included, the variable should be available in the next calls!! – user16948 Dec 9 '12 at 11:35
    
No, those variables are local to the function scope and vanish after the first call is complete, when the interpreter leaves the function and continues with the code outside. At the second call, these variables are not present any more and (due to the "_once") do not get re-created. An include is only "permanent", if the included code contains something global, e.g., a class, function or constant definition. – Niko Dec 9 '12 at 11:41
    
Thanks. where is this documented in?: "An include is only "permanent", if the included code contains something global, e.g., a class, function or constant definition" – user16948 Dec 9 '12 at 11:53

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