Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I wrote a program that is supposed select the perfect squares from an array and put it into another array. Example: (2,4,13,5,25,66) and the second array(the result) should look like this (4,25) My result looks like this (0,4,0,0,25,0) ...so its half good ...how to make it show only 4,25 ?

#include<iostream.h>
#include<math.h.>

int main()
{
    int A[100],i,n,p,j;

    cout << "Number of array elements=";
    cin >> n;

    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
    {
        cout<<"A["<<i<<"]=";
        cin>>A[i];
    }

    for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
    {
        p=sqrt(A[i]) ;   
        if(p*p==A[i])
            A[j]=A[i];
        else
            A[i]=0;

        cout << A[i] << " ";
    }

    return 0;
}

USING ONLY c++ basic commands...as i did

share|improve this question
2  
What do you think j will do? And is there some reason "another array" is the same array? –  Beta Dec 9 '12 at 12:29

5 Answers 5

You need to keep a separate count of how many perfect squares you've found and use that to place your answers into an array of perfect squares:

int squares[???];
// ...
if(p*p==A[i]) {
  squares[squaresFound]=A[i];
  squaresFound++;
}

The problem now will be to decide how long the squares array should be. You don't know ahead of time how many squares you're going to get. Are you going to have it the same size as A and fill the rest with 0s? Or do you want the array of squares to be exactly the right size?

If you want it to be the right size, you're much better off using a std::vector:

std::vector<int> squares;
// ...
if(p*p==A[i]) {
  squares.push_back(A[i]);
}

But I think your silly "only basic C++ commands" restriction will not allow you to do this.

share|improve this answer

You talk about a second array (the result), yet your code declares only one array! Additionally, you reference A[j], but your j has not be initialized.

You should declare another array B[100], initialize j to zero, and then use this code when you find a square:

int j = 0;
for (int i=0 ; i != n ; i++) {
    int p = sqrt(A[i]);
    if(p*p==A[i]) {
        B[j++] = A[i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It is technically possible to use A as the result array as long as j is actually used. –  Emil Vikström Dec 9 '12 at 12:32
1  
@EmilVikström Absolutely! However, this is not the way the question is phrased. I strongly suspect that this is either a school assignment or a self-study where the second array is required. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 9 '12 at 12:35
    
School asignment ! –  cUser26 Dec 9 '12 at 12:44

Make another array, remove all occurrences of 0 from the resultArray and add non-0 to newArray.

OR

int j=0
if(A[i]==p*p) 
  squares[j++]=A[i];
share|improve this answer
#include <cmath>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;


int main()
{
    int A[100];
    int n;

    cout << "Number of array elements = " << endl;
    cin >> n;
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        cout << "A[" << i << "] = ";
        cin >> A[i];
    }

    int B[100];
    int cnt_sqr = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        int p = sqrt(A[i]);
        if (p * p == A[i])
        {
            B[cnt_sqr++] = A[i];
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < cnt_sqr; i++)
    {
        cout << B[i] << ' ';
    }
    return 0;
}

Full code of that about what you were told above

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much Dima00782, exactly what i wanted tnx –  cUser26 Dec 9 '12 at 12:41

If you do not want to modify your code you can write the following:

for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
{
    p=sqrt(A[i]) ;   
    if(p*p==A[i])
    {
        cout << A[i] << " ";
    }
}

It will print you only perfect squares.

If you want to copy elements to another array:

int squares[100] = {0}; // Assuming that all values can be perfect squares
int square_count = 0;

for(i=1;i<=n;i++)
{
    p=sqrt(A[i]) ;   
    if(p*p==A[i])
    {
        squares[square_count++] = A[i];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
yeah tnx very usefull answer but i have to make a new vector that will show those values –  cUser26 Dec 10 '12 at 18:02
    
@JohnSmith, please see edited answer –  Alex Dec 10 '12 at 19:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.