Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write code like here but using C++11 features, without Boost.

Working from this example, I tried to define a response_trait, and basee conditional compilation on the result of the trait. How can I make this work?

#include <vector>
using namespace std ;

struct Vector{ float x,y,z ; } ;
struct Vertex { Vector pos ; } ;
struct VertexN { Vector pos, normal ; } ;
struct Matrix {} ;

template <typename T>
struct response_trait {
  static bool const has_normal = false;
} ;

template <>
struct response_trait<VertexN> {
  static bool const has_normal = true;
} ;

template <typename T>
struct Model
{
  vector<T> verts ;

  void transform( Matrix m )
  {
    for( int i = 0 ; i < verts.size() ; i++ )
    {
      #if response_trait<T>::has_normal==true
      puts( "Has normal" ) ;
      // will choke compiler if T doesn't have .normal member
      printf( "normal = %f %f %f\n", verts[i].normal.x, verts[i].normal.y, verts[i].normal.z ) ;
      #else
      puts( "Doesn't have normal" ) ;
      printf( "pos = %f %f %f\n", verts[i].pos.x, verts[i].pos.y, verts[i].pos.z ) ;
      #endif
    }
  }

} ;

int main()
{
  Matrix m ;
  Model<Vertex> model ;
  model.verts.push_back( Vertex() ) ;
  model.transform( m ) ;

  Model<VertexN> modelNormal ;
  modelNormal.verts.push_back( VertexN() ) ;
  modelNormal.transform( m ) ;
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you please make your question self-contained and describe what you're trying to achieve? –  Kerrek SB Dec 9 '12 at 12:51
1  
It is self contained. #if T has a .normal member, the response_trait has_normal should be true, and the correct compilation path should be chosen. –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 12:53
    
Unless I've completely misunderstood type traits. The linked question was my starting point, but I have no idea if I've taken it the wrong way. –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 12:54
4  
You can't use the preprocessor directives for this, as traits is a C++ compile-time concept and does not involve the preprocessor at all. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 9 '12 at 12:57
1  
Additionally you can use en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/is_same with VertexN directly. –  tauran Dec 9 '12 at 13:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You could try something like this:

void transform_impl(Matrix const & m, std::true_type const &)
{
    // has normal
}

void transform_impl(Matrix const & m, std::false_type const &)
{
    // doesn't have normal
}

void transform(Matrix const & m)
{
    transform_impl(m, response_trait<T>());
}

You just need to modify your trait a bit:

#include <type_traits>
template <typename> struct response_trait : std::false_type { };
template <> struct response_trait<VectorN> : std::true_type { };
share|improve this answer
    
Is there an advantage to plain template specialization? –  tauran Dec 9 '12 at 12:58
1  
@tauran: This is plain template specialization, isn't it? Am I missing something? Or are you referring to the overloaded functions? Function templates don't like specializations very much... –  Kerrek SB Dec 9 '12 at 13:00
    
Nice answer man. The linked question is missing this. –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 13:02
    
@Kerrek SB: I just meant making transform a function (outside of Model) instead of a method and specialize that. But now I see that your answer is perfect if you want to keep methods. –  tauran Dec 9 '12 at 13:06
    
Just a note you have to take out typename in the line transform_impl(m, typename response_trait<T>()); for this to work in XCode 4.4, C++11 compilation. But the code works as is in VS2012. –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 18:42

Here is an alternative solution if your code can be put into functions without making your design cumbersome (e.g. when you need access to a lot of member variables of your object). Of course sometimes it is preferrable to specialize the whole class.

#include <vector>
#include <stdio.h>

using namespace std ;

struct Vector{ float x,y,z ; } ;
struct Vertex { Vector pos ; } ;
struct VertexN { Vector pos, normal ; } ;
struct Matrix {} ;

template <typename T>
void printVertex(T vert)
{
      printf( "Doesn't have normal" ) ;
      printf( "pos = %f %f %f\n", vert.pos.x, vert.pos.y, vert.pos.z ) ;
}

template <>
void printVertex(VertexN vert)
{
      printf( "Has normal" ) ;
      printf( "normal = %f %f %f\n", vert.normal.x, vert.normal.y, vert.normal.z ) ;
}

template <typename T>
struct Model
{
  vector<T> verts ;

  void transform( Matrix m )
  {
    for( int i = 0 ; i < verts.size() ; i++ )
    {
        printVertex(verts[i]);
    }
  }
} ;

int main()
{
  Matrix m ;
  Model<Vertex> model ;
  model.verts.push_back( Vertex() ) ;
  model.transform( m ) ;

  Model<VertexN> modelNormal ;
  modelNormal.verts.push_back( VertexN() ) ;
  modelNormal.transform( m ) ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is very clever. I didn't think about making global functions instead of member functions. Perhaps this is why the STL has its functions as global functions (std::find, etc.) –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 18:14
2  
It turns out this way is a bit more cumbersome, it will encourage template specialization of more types than using type traits. Consider if you have a couple of more vertex formats, VertexNC (vertex with normal, color), VertexNTC (vertex with normal, texcoord, color). You'd have to template specialize every Vertex type with a normal in it, instead of setting the hasNormal flag on or off in the type traits. –  bobobobo Dec 9 '12 at 18:23
    
It depends on the situation. In this case I would pick the other solution too :) –  tauran Dec 9 '12 at 19:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.