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Hey i was just wondering would any of these warnings cause the .exe to crash upon start. Here are the warnings:

Warning 1   warning C4244: '=' : conversion from 'double' to 'int', possible loss of data   c:\users\conor\documents\college\dkit - year 2 - repeat\dkit - year 2 - semester 1 - repeat\games programming\maroonedca2\maroonedca2\stats.cpp 54  1   MaroonedCA2
Warning 2   warning C4244: 'argument' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data   c:\users\conor\documents\college\dkit - year 2 - repeat\dkit - year 2 - semester 1 - repeat\games programming\maroonedca2\maroonedca2\player.cpp    75  1   MaroonedCA2
Warning 3   warning C4244: 'argument' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data   c:\users\conor\documents\college\dkit - year 2 - repeat\dkit - year 2 - semester 1 - repeat\games programming\maroonedca2\maroonedca2\player.cpp    92  1   MaroonedCA2
Warning 4   warning C4018: '<' : signed/unsigned mismatch   c:\users\conor\documents\college\dkit - year 2 - repeat\dkit - year 2 - semester 1 - repeat\games programming\maroonedca2\maroonedca2\inventory.cpp 63  1   MaroonedCA2

1

int stats[SIZE];
    stats[0] = Status.health;
    stats[1] = Status.strength;
    stats[2] = Status.hitpoints;
    stats[3] = Status.armour;
    stats[4] = Status.luck;

Luck is a double and has not been casted.

2

 int Player :: hitPoints()
    {
        srand(time(0)); // seed random number generator based on current time
        int randomNumber= rand(); // generate random number
        int hitPoints = (randomNumber% 15) + 1; // get a number between 1 and 20
        return hitPoints;
    }

3

int Player :: fatigue()
{
    srand(time(0)); // seed random number generator based on current time
    int randomNumber= rand(); // generate random number
    int fatigue = (randomNumber% 5) + 1; // get a number between 1 and 5
    return fatigue;
}

4

for (int i= 0; i< inventory.size(); ++i)
        cout<< inventory[i] << endl;
    }
    cout << "\n-----------------------------------------\n";
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1  
Not that I can see. But you should learn what those warnings are about, they are easily fixed and best to not get in the habit of writing code that generates them. –  PeterJ Dec 9 '12 at 13:22
1  
Well, warnings have no effect on the generated code, so no. However, warnings may indicate you have a bug in your code that COULD cause a crash. (Or you could have such a bug and no warning.) The above warnings are more suggestive of data loss than something that would directly cause a crash, but there can be issues of loop controls or array indexing where they led to a crash. (It's good practice to examine each warning, understand why it was issued, and if it's a "non-issue" insert an explicit cast or whatever to silence it and indicate that you understand the problem.) –  Hot Licks Dec 9 '12 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In isolation, none of these warnings could cause a crash. However, they could be causing other functions to be called erroneously which do not respond well to unexpected values.

You should get a stack trace for your crash to see why it occurs. Debugging is a separate topic all together and something you can get a lot of information from through Google :)

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The only one of these I can see as having any real possibility of inducing a crash would be the last. If inventory.size() > INT_MAX, then in a typical implementation, you're going to eventually read from a negative index.

Assuming your program actually is crashing during starting, I'd be rather surprised if this was the source of the problem though. It's more a theoretical possibility than a likely problem source. First, at startup, I'd guess that inventory.size() is probably 0, so the overflow wouldn't occur. Second, I'd guess that you only display the inventory in response to a command, not during startup - so this code probably doesn't execute during startup.

The others have problems, but not ones that are at all likely to lead to crashes.

Just for example, your examples #2 and #3 are using srand incorrectly -- most normal programs, almost certainly including this one, should call srand exactly once as the program is starting up, and never call it again. That will lead to your "random" numbers being much more predictable than they should be, but not to crashing.

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Will your program crash?

Well usually these warnings don't cause too many problems unless for example you miss some special cases in your program like converting double to int but not checking if this int becomes 0 and you divide by 0.

Let's go through all the warning:

Warning 1   warning C4244: '=' : conversion from 'double' to 'int', possible loss of data

It should be obvious that int can't store all values of double but there is nothing wrong with converting it as long as you keep in mind that it might have become a value which can cause problems (like converting by 0) but this depends on what you do with your int. Try int toint = static_cast<int>(yourdouble); shouldn't throw a warning.

Warning 2   warning C4244: 'argument' : conversion from 'time_t' to 'unsigned int', possible loss of data

time_t usually has 8 bytes, uint only 4 so obviously it can't store all information inside. The loss of data can cause confusion when you expect a value but you're getting a different one.

Warning 4   warning C4018: '<' : signed/unsigned mismatch

Again no problem with this. It just informs you that on one side might be a negative value and on the other one it's impossible or that the maximum value of the one side is higher than the maximum on the other side. Very common warning which usually happens because of the laziness of programmers to define integers as unsigned when only unsigned is needed.

Edit: I assume you're using VC. Here are is an example on how to ignore warnings IFF you are sure you can't get rid of them and they are completely safe to ignore (I strongly recommend to use the once parameter):

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2c8f766e(v=vs.80).aspx

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Each warning indicates that something isn't quite right. This can affect other code.


In …

int stats[SIZE];
stats[0] = Status.health;
stats[1] = Status.strength;
stats[2] = Status.hitpoints;
stats[3] = Status.armour;
stats[4] = Status.luck;

With Status.luck of type double, you're either losing information, or using a too general type. The information loss could cause a crash later. The too general type could cause bugs elsewhere.

The fix depends on which of those two possibilities it is.


In

int Player :: hitPoints()
{
    srand(time(0)); // seed random number generator based on current time
    int randomNumber= rand(); // generate random number
    int hitPoints = (randomNumber% 15) + 1; // get a number between 1 and 20
    return hitPoints;
}

you're relying on an implicit conversion from the type of time(0) to the argument type of srand.

time is possibly OK as a source of entropy for a game (but not for a dice-roll program that's invoked repeatedly). But do use a static_cast here. To the documented formal argument type.


In

int Player :: fatigue()
{
    srand(time(0)); // seed random number generator based on current time
    int randomNumber= rand(); // generate random number
    int fatigue = (randomNumber% 5) + 1; // get a number between 1 and 5
    return fatigue;
}

you're re-initializing the random number generator. That is most likely a bug. I can't imagine that you want the same behavior to repeat each time a player gets fatigued.


In

for (int i= 0; i< inventory.size(); ++i)
    cout<< inventory[i] << endl;
    }
cout << "\n-----------------------------------------\n";

you have some missing brace or braces, and/or an indentation problem. Unfortunately it compiled. But fix it.

The signed/unsigned mismatch is about the comparision of signed i with unsigned size_t from inventory.size(). In some situations this can cause nasty bugs. For example, the expression

string( "hello" ).size() < -3

will always be true, due to implicit promotion of -3 to unsigned type, with wrap-around. It's extrremely silly. And very much worth being aware of.

The best fix for the loop is to use a size function that casts the size value to signed, e.g.

typedef ptrdiff_t Size;

template< class Item >
Size size( std::vector<Item> const& v ) { return v.size(); }

then

for (int i= 0; i < size( inventory ); ++i)
{
    cout<< inventory[i] << endl;
}

This centralizes the solution so that it works for all future code.

Changing the loop control variable to unsigned type just pushes the problem (in particular the implicit conversion problem) to another place. Note that in general you will not get any warning about such an implicit conversion. Most compilers warn only for direct comparisons.

For an even more general size function, you can define it as

template< class Container >
Size size( Container const& c ) { return end( c ) - begin( c ); }

where begin and end are C++11 functions from the <utility> header.

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