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I want to keep my linux config in fossil scm system.

Here is what I did at initial stage.

$ cd /
$ fossil new b.fsl
$ fossil open b.fsl
$ fossil add etc/group
$ fossil add boot/grub/menu.lst
$ fossil ci -m 'init commit'

I want do do things like (operate like hg/git).

$ cd etc
$ fossil status group
$ fossil add motd

It will show error message:

fossil: current directory is not within an open checkout

So, my temp dirty solution is

$ cd /
$ fossil status etc/group
$ fossil add etc/motd
$ fossil add /etc/motd # this line will cause problem

For my git/hg experiences, it should work.

$ cd /
$ hg init
$ hg add etc/group boot/grub/menu.lst
$ hg ci -m 'init commit'
$ cd etc
$ hg status group  # it works
$ hg add motd # it works too
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3 Answers

This situation is covered in great detail in the User Guide, which I recommend wholeheartedly.

http://www.fossil-scm.org/schimpf-book/home

In particular, see version 2.0 of the fossilbook.pdf, in section 2, entitled "Single Users", the section starting with:

I have a directory called FOSSIL in which I keep all my repositories, Fossil doesn’t care but it helps me to keep them all in one place so I can back them up.

The first command there shows how to call relative directories:

$ fossil new ../FOSSIL/FossilBook.fossil
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Could you point out which section have the same situation? I've ever read the old version of this book. –  Daniel YC Lin Feb 26 at 3:01
    
@DanielYCLin, unless I misread the question, section 2 has examples (see my edit above). –  PatrickT Feb 26 at 3:32
    
The key point of this question is '/'. Root directory problem. –  Daniel YC Lin Feb 26 at 4:13
    
@DanielYCLin, Ok, perhaps clarify this in your question, so others may benefit from it and the answer? –  PatrickT Feb 26 at 18:36
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All mentioned commands "add" and "status" and all fossil commands related to the checkout must be executed when the current directory is set somewhere inside the directory tree of the checkout.

You can't specify the checkout directory yourself as a command line option.

It seems there is a bug (or intentionally introduced feature) in fossil that prevents it searching for the open checkout file (".fslchkout" or "FOSSIL") up to the root directory. That is why in this case you must be in the root directory when you execute commands on this checkout.

Of course all executions of fossil in this case must be with root privileges. Otherwise, even in the root directory you will get "not within checkout" error.

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I've specified add stat under opened directory. These command works fine under sub-directory but root. –  Daniel YC Lin Feb 2 '13 at 2:10
    
Ah, I got it now. It seems it is a bug in fossil. It simply does not search properly for the file ".fslchkout" which indicates the open checkout, when this file is located in the root directory. –  johnfound Feb 2 '13 at 6:14
    
I edited my answer in order to include the above findings. –  johnfound Feb 2 '13 at 6:27
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Before the command

$ fossil new b.fsl

Type the command

$ cd etc

If you want the fossil repo stored in another folder, change the commands

$ fossil new b.fsl
$ fossil open b.fsl

to

$ fossil new path_to_repo/b.fsl
$ fossil open path_to_repo/b.fsl
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I want to keep etc sub-directory name. –  Daniel YC Lin Dec 10 '12 at 17:36
    
I do not understand your comment. I am not suggesting you change the name of the /etc directory! –  ravenspoint Dec 10 '12 at 19:35
    
I want keep the information /etc/... /boot/..., in hg/git, it will check ancestry directory to get relative directory information. –  Daniel YC Lin Dec 11 '12 at 0:56
    
Perhaps you could edit your question to clarify what the problem is, and why the solution I have suggested does not solve it. Your comments are too brief for me to understand. –  ravenspoint Dec 11 '12 at 17:05
    
I'm wonder should I force to write full file name if I have many subdirectories, I don't think it is a smart/correct method. –  Daniel YC Lin Dec 12 '12 at 4:51
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