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I have a web app where I want to show a form for a Test object. Different Test instances can have different schemas. I can display this pretty nicely, but it won't populate all the data from the form back into my model.

Here are my model classes:

public class EnterTestData
{
    public string StudyId { get; set; }
    public Test Test { get; set; }
}

public sealed class Test
{
    public string Identity { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<TestField> Fields { get; set; }
}

public sealed class TestField
{
    public string Identity { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }
    public string Type { get; set; }
}

Here is the relevant portion of my View:

<% Html.BeginForm("PostTestData", "StudiesUserInterface"); %>
<table>
    <%
        foreach (var testField in Model.Test.Fields)
            Html.RenderPartial("UserControls/TestFieldUserControlascx", testField);

        foreach (var category in Model.Test.Categories)
        {
    %>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2" style="font-style: italic; text-align: center;">
            <%=category.Name %>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <% 
            foreach (var testField in category.Fields)
                Html.RenderPartial("UserControls/TestFieldUserControlascx", testField);

        }
    %>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2" style="text-align: right;">
            <input type="submit" name="newsletter" value="Enter Result" />
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>
<% Html.EndForm(); %>

And the partial view for the actual text boxes:

<tr>
    <td>
        <%= Model.Name %>
    </td>
    <td>
        <%
            switch (Model.Type)
            {
                case "date":
                case "text":
                case "number":
        %>
        <%=  Html.TextBox(Model.name, Model.Value) %>
        <%  break;
                default: %><%= Html.Label("Unknown data type") %><% break;
            }
        %>
    </td>
</tr>

Update Controller methods:

    public ActionResult EnterTestData(string studyId, string testId)
    {
        var testDefinition = ServiceKitLocator.GetStudyService().GetTestDefinition(testId);

        return View(new EnterTestData { StudyId = studyId, Test = testDefinition });
    }

    public ActionResult PostTestData(EnterTestData model)
    {
        //I'm just putting a break point here and checking the model in the debugger for now
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }

The problem is that Test is null when it comes back to my Controller. How do I get it to be populated? Why is it null?

share|improve this question
    
can you show your controller action methods also ? –  Sampath Dec 9 '12 at 14:50
    
Done. Also, I realized that my TextBox in the partial view was poorly defined, so I updated that as well. –  tallseth Dec 9 '12 at 15:10
    
as a best practice you always try to give [HttpGet] or [HttpPost] for your actions methods.It's very difficult to understand which one is get and post ? –  Sampath Dec 9 '12 at 15:14
    
can you put your EF data access code also ? and Index action method ? –  Sampath Dec 9 '12 at 15:20
    
I don't have any EF code, I'm not using EF. It's also not relevant. –  tallseth Dec 9 '12 at 15:37

1 Answer 1

I think the problem is the Html.TextBox element. If it's correct that the model in your view is type of "Test" but in your controller action you want to bind to type of "EnterTestData" which has a property of type "Test" named "Test" Then your TextBox should be initializied like

Html.TextBox("Test.Name", Model.Value)

The important part is the name parameter. The modelbinder matches this name with the properties of the model type in your post action, in your case "EnterTestData".

You can also use an editor template view. Which does the same as your partial view. In your project go to Views\Shared\ and create a folder named EditorTemplates, if not exists. In this folder create a partial view and name it like the class/type the template should be for. In your case "TestField.ascx". Actually you can copy and rename your existing partial view. In you main view you have to change 2 things: - use for instead of foreach - call the editor template in the loops like:

for(int i = 0; i < Model.Test.Fields.Count(); i++)
            Html.EditorFor(Model => Model.Test.Fields[i]);

In the template view you have to change one thing: - user TextBoxFor instead of TextBox like:

Html.TextBoxFor(Model => Model.Value)

I use this pattern often. It makes it easy to bind complex models. You may have a look at the generated HTML

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @developer10214. I ended up solving this by writing a custom IModelBinder, and was about to post that answer. But since this more pointedly addresses the question I asked, I'll test it out tomorrow and see if it works. –  tallseth Dec 10 '12 at 5:47

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