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I'm having issues with using some sockets in C++ code with Android NDK. Two sockets are created, and one reads from the other. This works with a network connection on Android, both with and without a network connection on another machine, but NOT on Android without a network connection.

Here is a netstat output before the socket closes. The line of interest is

tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:32993        127.0.0.1:46810        ESTABLISHED

Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address          Foreign Address        State
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:32993          0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:45549          0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:5037         0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:5555           0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:46811        127.0.0.1:32993        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:32993        127.0.0.1:46811        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:46810        127.0.0.1:32993        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:32993        127.0.0.1:46810        ESTABLISHED
tcp        0      0 10.0.2.15:5555         10.0.2.2:34217         ESTABLISHED
udp        0      0 10.0.2.15:49667        10.0.2.3:53           
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:60262          0.0.0.0:*      

I then attempt to read 10 bytes from the socket 127.0.0.1:46810 (header_length - filled = 10):

bytes = read(fd, header, header_length - filled);

However, 0 bytes are read. TCP_NODELAY has been set on the socket. This is the netstat output after the read.

Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address          Foreign Address        State
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:32993          0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:5037         0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:5555           0.0.0.0:*              LISTEN
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:46811        127.0.0.1:32993        FIN_WAIT2
tcp        0      1 127.0.0.1:32993        127.0.0.1:46811        CLOSE_WAIT
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:46810        127.0.0.1:32993        FIN_WAIT2
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:32993        127.0.0.1:46810        CLOSE_WAIT
tcp        0      0 10.0.2.15:5555         10.0.2.2:34217         ESTABLISHED
udp        0      0 0.0.0.0:60262          0.0.0.0:*        

There are no problems when there is a network connection, and the addresses used are still 127.0.0.1. Why would it fail to read any bytes on localhost when there is no network connection?

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I suspect it could be related to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6679833/… –  Tom Smith Dec 9 '12 at 15:51
    
Reading zero bytes from TCP socket means the other side has closed the connection. Post your code, it's impossible for us to help you otherwise. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Dec 9 '12 at 17:16

1 Answer 1

Turns out that this was being caused by another issue. Some time after resolving the IP address into a char array, delete[] was being called on the array. When there was no network connection, the pointer was being reassigned directly to 127.0.0.1, so the program was crashing on the delete[]. Copying the IP into the array using

strcpy(ip, "127.0.0.1");

means that the pointer still points at the array, and the program does not crash when calling delete[].

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1  
Always have a "logcat" window open when doing android-ndk development. Native crashes result in fairly dramatic log output. –  fadden Dec 10 '12 at 23:42
    
@fadden: +1 for "dramatic" as a description of log output. :-) –  CommonsWare Dec 10 '12 at 23:59

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