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I tried to open a file with fopen() function in PHP and it output warning of failure to open stream: permission denied. You know that warning / error you encounter when apache doesn't have enough privileges to open a particular file.

However despite the warning message being displayed, my PHP script successfully opened the file and wrote a string into it. It doesn't make sense.

So what is matter? I can put a @ immediately before fopen() but still it's weird and I want to know why PHP behaves this way. Is there something I didn't configure right?

class XMLDB {

    private $file = null;
    private $xml = null;
    private $defs = array();
    private $recs = array();

    // private members above, public members below

    public function __construct($xmlfile) {
    	if (!file_exists($xmlfile)) {
    		die('XML file does not exist.');
    	}
    	$this -> file = $xmlfile;
    	$this -> xml = simplexml_load_file($this -> file);
    	$this -> iniVocab();
    	$this -> iniData();
    }

... /* lots of private and public functions */

    public function commit() {
    	$xmlfile = fopen($this -> file, 'w'); // this is causing the warning
    	$doc = new DOMDocument('1.0');
    	$doc -> preserveWhiteSpace = false;
    	$doc -> loadXML($this -> xml -> asXML());
    	$doc -> formatOutput = true;
    	fwrite($xmlfile, $doc->saveXML());
    }

    public function __destruct() {
    	$this -> commit();
    	/* comment this line out and there won't be any warnings, 
    	/* therefore it should trace back to here. So I found out that
    	/* it's when I use die() that eventually calls __destruct()
    	/* which in turn calls commit() to trigger this fopen warning. */
    }
}

EDIT: So every first time I try to write something to the opened file, it's all right. Then if the class tries to commit all changes to the file again when the page is unloaded, that is, the object to be destroyed, it calls the __destruct() method and $this -> commit() to write the changes to the file - this is when the error occurs and it refuses to write to the file and pomping out the permission denied message. It's weird.

share|improve this question
    
Which version of PHP and OS are you using? – txyoji Sep 4 '09 at 12:33
    
Debian 5.0 Lenny and PHP 5.2.6 It's really weird. I just tried to chmod 777 the file to be written to and PHP still pumps out the permission denied warning. Yet the operation is successful. – kavoir.com Sep 4 '09 at 15:11
    
Apache 2. The file is assigned to the group of www-data which is Apache. Whether the permissions are 666 or 660 don't matter. The operation is successful but PHP still keeps giving out the warning. – kavoir.com Sep 4 '09 at 15:15
    
Seems it's particularly about the use of fopen inside a class because when I try a plain php file with <?php $fh = fopen('test.txt', 'w'); fwrite($fh, 'test'); ?> to test fopen and fwrite to write to the same file, no warnings are given. I have just listed the class in the question description. – kavoir.com Sep 4 '09 at 15:18
    
Can you paste the actual error message(s) that you're seeing? mod_apache or fastcgi (or other?) Any security related modules installed or enabled in your apache configuration? – Wez Furlong Sep 9 '09 at 1:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem may be that you forget to close your file with fclose.

Since you open the file, write stuff, and then try to open your already opened file. This might be the cause of the permission denial.

The commit function should look like this:

public function commit() {
    $xmlfile = fopen($this -> file, 'w');
    $doc = new DOMDocument('1.0');
    $doc -> preserveWhiteSpace = false;
    $doc -> loadXML($this -> xml -> asXML());
    $doc -> formatOutput = true;
    fwrite($xmlfile, $doc->saveXML());
    fclose($this -> file);
}
share|improve this answer
    
He's on to something here. – user192230 Oct 29 '09 at 23:29
    
I had a similar issue to this where I was testing the __destruct() magic method by running a couple of simple functions including logging to a file. All code I placed in my __destruct() method would run when the object went out of scope without calling unset($var) however PHP would not write to the log file I specified instead generating the permissions error described above. It would only execute the code AND write to the log file I specified if unset($var) was called. Hope that helps someone. :-D – dkcwd Jun 18 '12 at 18:55

Are you sure you are getting this "permission denied" every time regardless of do this file exist or not? What is the folder permission this file resides at? You may have given read access to it, but not execute for example.

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Try using file_put_contents().... but i belive it would issue the same warnings...

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Does it give you the warning when you do that outside of __destruct? Might be something to do with that. Or apache has write permissions but not read?

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