Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have an abstract class implemented by several concrete classes with different memory footprint, in order to use polymorphism.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class abstractFoo {
public:
    virtual void method() = 0;
};

First concrete class:

class concreteFoo1 : public abstractFoo {
private:
    int member1;
public:
    concreteFoo1() {
        cout << "Constructing Foo1" << endl;
        member1 = 1;
    }
    virtual void method() {
        cout << "Foo1 member: " << member1 << endl;
    }
};

Another concrete class:

class concreteFoo2 : public abstractFoo {
private:
    int member1;
    int member2;
public:
    concreteFoo2() {
        cout << "Constructing Foo2" << endl;
        member1 = 2;
        member2 = 3;
    }
    void method() {
        cout << "Foo2 members: " << member1 << ", " << member2 << endl;
    }
};

What I want to do is to declare an object of abstract type abstractFoo and passing it as a parameters in a function which will create it as an object of either concrete type concreteFoo1 or concreteFoo2. I first use the usual way, with a pointer passed in parameter:

enum typeFoo {FOO1, FOO2};

void createFoo(typeFoo type, abstractFoo *foo) {
    switch (type) {
    case FOO1:
        foo = &concreteFoo1();
        break;
    case FOO2:
        foo = &concreteFoo2();
        break;
    }
}

int main() {
    abstractFoo *foo = new concreteFoo1();
    createFoo(FOO2, foo);
    foo->method();        //Not expected result!
    return 0;
}

Output is:

Constructing Foo1
Constructing Foo2
Foo1 member: 1

The problem is I can't initialize foo as an object of abstract type, and if I initialize as concreteFoo1, as I did in this example, the foo pointer will still point to it, even after calling createFoo method.

In order to make it works, I was told to pass a pointer to a pointer in parameter:

enum typeFoo {FOO1, FOO2};

void createFoo(typeFoo type, abstractFoo **foo) {
    switch (type) {
    case FOO1:
        *foo = new concreteFoo1();
        break;
    case FOO2:
        *foo = new concreteFoo2();
        break;
    }
}
int main() {
    abstractFoo *foo = new concreteFoo1();
    createFoo(FOO2, & foo);
    foo->method();        //Expected result
    return 0;
}

Output:

Constructing Foo1
Constructing Foo2
Foo2 members: 2, 3

Well, this solution work, but I am not very pleased by it: I still can't create a pointer to an abstract type, so I have to construct an object I will not use in astractFoo* foo = new concreteFoo1(), and the memory allocated to it is never freed, so I think I will end with a memory leak.

Is there a way to create AbstractFoo** , a pointer to a pointer to an abstract type, without constructing an object?

So, can you confirm that a double pointer is the rigth solution to my problem, and if so, can you answer my two problems? If not, how should I do?

share|improve this question

If you use a std::unique_ptr<abstractFoo>, as a return type and combine it with the factory pattern, you solve both the memory allocation issues and the creation issue.

Note that you'll need a virtual destructor in abstractFoo.

A double pointer is not the C++ thing to do. It's a remainder from C. Passing a pointer by reference would be more C++-ish. Not using pointers, but smart pointers instead if even more C++-ish.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, but I can't pass foo as a return type since in my real example I will have to pass (and create) several objects. I tried to pass a unique_ptr as a parameter, but I got the following error: error: conversion from ‘std::unique_ptr<abstractFoo, std::default_delete<abstractFoo> > (*)()’ to non-scalar type ‘std::unique_ptr<abstractFoo, std::default_delete<abstractFoo> >’ requested – corentin Dec 10 '12 at 9:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, I just found that you can create pointer with operator new, so I answer my own question:

enum typeFoo {FOO1, FOO2};
void createFoo(typeFoo type, abstractFoo **foo) {
    switch (type) {
    case FOO1:
        *foo = new concreteFoo1();
        break;
    case FOO2:
        *foo = new concreteFoo2();
        break;
    }
}
int main() {
    abstractFoo **foo = new abstractFoo*;
    createFoo(FOO2, foo);
    abstractFoo *foo2Ptr = *foo;
    foo2Ptr->method();        //Expected result
    delete foo2Ptr;
    createFoo(FOO1, foo);
    abstractFoo *foo1Ptr = *foo;
    foo1Ptr->method();        //Expected result
    delete foo1Ptr;

    return 0;
}

Output:

Constructing Foo2
Foo2 members: 2, 3
Constructing Foo1
Foo1 member: 1

Any comment, especially if I should use reference or smart pointers?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.