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In the days of version 3.x of Apache Commons HttpClient, making a multipart/form-data POST request was possible (an example from 2004). Unfortunately this is no longer possible in version 4.0 of HttpClient.

For our core activity "HTTP", multipart is somewhat out of scope. We'd love to use multipart code maintained by some other project for which it is in scope, but I'm not aware of any. We tried to move the multipart code to commons-codec a few years ago, but I didn't take off there. Oleg recently mentioned another project that has multipart parsing code and might be interested in our multipart formatting code. I don't know the current status on that. (http://www.nabble.com/multipart-form-data-in-4.0-td14224819.html)

Is anybody aware of any Java library that allows me to write an HTTP client that can make a multipart/form-data POST request?

Background: I want to use the Remote API of Zoho Writer.

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In my opinion, HTTp Client 4.0 is nowhere near ready for real usage. It's functionality is a subset of 3.1, and they don't seem especially inclined to address that. –  skaffman Sep 4 '09 at 12:32
    
Unfortunately, classes like MultipartPostMethod from 3.1 are deprecated. I'd like to use all the good new things from 4.0 but multipart/form-data is essential to me. That's why I ask if you know any alternative. –  lutz Sep 4 '09 at 12:41
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5 Answers 5

up vote 55 down vote accepted

We use HttpClient 4.0 to make multipart file post. Here is a snippet of relevant code,

HttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();
HttpPost httppost = new HttpPost(url);

FileBody bin = new FileBody(new File(fileName));
StringBody comment = new StringBody("Filename: " + fileName);

MultipartEntity reqEntity = new MultipartEntity();
reqEntity.addPart("bin", bin);
reqEntity.addPart("comment", comment);
httppost.setEntity(reqEntity);

HttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httppost);
HttpEntity resEntity = response.getEntity();

This was done with a Beta version of HttpClient 4.0 a few years ago but I doubt these functions would be removed.

Edit (Michael-O, 2014-05-08): As of version 4.3, some classes have been deprecated. Here is the new code:

CloseableHttpClient httpClient = HttpClients.createDefault();
HttpPost uploadFile = new HttpPost("...");

MultipartEntityBuilder builder = MultipartEntityBuilder.create();
builder.addTextBody("field1", "yes", ContentType.TEXT_PLAIN);
builder.addBinaryBody("file", new File("..."), ContentType.APPLICATION_OCTET_STREAM, "file.ext");
HttpEntity multipart = builder.build();

uploadFile.setEntity(multipart);

response = httpClient.execute(uploadFile);
responseEntity = response.getEntity();
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29  
Ah, the multipart stuff has been moved to org.apache.httpcomponents-httpmime-4.0! Could be mentioned somewhere :/ –  lutz Sep 4 '09 at 13:00
    
How can I give file Content as string to FileBody? Can you take a look at similar question –  Abhishek Simon May 4 '12 at 11:35
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These are the Maven dependencies I have.

Java Code:

HttpClient httpclient = new DefaultHttpClient();
HttpPost httpPost = new HttpPost(url);

FileBody uploadFilePart = new FileBody(uploadFile);
MultipartEntity reqEntity = new MultipartEntity();
reqEntity.addPart("upload-file", uploadFilePart);
httpPost.setEntity(reqEntity);

HttpResponse response = httpclient.execute(httpPost);

Maven Dependencies in pom.xml:

<dependency>
  <groupId>org.apache.httpcomponents</groupId>
  <artifactId>httpclient</artifactId>
  <version>4.0.1</version>
  <scope>compile</scope>
</dependency>
<dependency>
  <groupId>org.apache.httpcomponents</groupId>
  <artifactId>httpmime</artifactId>
  <version>4.0.1</version>
  <scope>compile</scope>
</dependency>
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1  
+1 for adding Maven dependencies. Time saving! –  Juan Calero Jan 24 '11 at 12:16
    
you'll need httpcore as well, at least in 4.2, for the HttpEntity class –  alalonde Jul 3 '12 at 3:58
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If size of the JARs matters (e.g. in case of applet), one can also directly use httpmime with java.net.HttpURLConnection instead of HttpClient.

httpclient-4.2.4:      423KB
httpmime-4.2.4:         26KB
httpcore-4.2.4:        222KB
commons-codec-1.6:     228KB
commons-logging-1.1.1:  60KB
Sum:                   959KB

httpmime-4.2.4:         26KB
httpcore-4.2.4:        222KB
Sum:                   248KB

Code:

HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
connection.setDoOutput(true);
connection.setRequestMethod("POST");

FileBody fileBody = new FileBody(new File(fileName));
MultipartEntity multipartEntity = new MultipartEntity(HttpMultipartMode.STRICT);
multipartEntity.addPart("file", fileBody);

connection.setRequestProperty("Content-Type", multipartEntity.getContentType().getValue());
OutputStream out = connection.getOutputStream();
try {
    multipartEntity.writeTo(out);
} finally {
    out.close();
}
int status = connection.getResponseCode();
...

Dependency in pom.xml:

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.apache.httpcomponents</groupId>
    <artifactId>httpmime</artifactId>
    <version>4.2.4</version>
</dependency>
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httpcomponents-client-4.0.1 worked for me. However I had to add the external jar apache-mime4j-0.6.jar (org.apache.james.mime4j) otherwise

reqEntity.addPart("bin", bin);

would not compile. It is running fine.

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You can also use REST Assured which builds on HTTP Client. It's very simple:

given().multiPart(new File("/somedir/file.bin")).when().post("/fileUpload");
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