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My app runs fine until I interrupt the initialization process at the very first start after installation by exiting and launching the app several times as long as the initialization process has not yet been finished. The processing logic and the AsyncTask can handle this pretty well, so I don't get any inconsistencies, but I have a problem with the heap. It increasing more and more while I do this disturbing exits and launches at app setup, which will lead to OutOfMemory error. I already found a leak by analyzing the heap with MAT but I still have another leak which I can't isolate yet.
For background info: I store the application context, a list and a timestamp in a static class to be able to access it from classes anywhere in my application without using tedious passing references by constructor. Anyway, there must be something wrong with this static class (ApplicationContext) since it causes a memory leak due to the list of zones. Zone objects are processed GeoJSON data. This is how this class looks like:

public class ApplicationContext extends Application {
    private static Context context;
    private static String timestamp;
    private static List<Zone> zones = new ArrayList<Zone>();

    public void onCreate()  {
        super.onCreate();
        ApplicationContext.context = getApplicationContext();
    }

    public static Context getAppContext() {
        return ApplicationContext.context;
    }

    public static List<Zone> getZones() {
        return zones;
    }

    public static void setData(String timestamp, List<Zone> zones) {
        ApplicationContext.timestamp = timestamp;
        ApplicationContext.zones = zones;
    }

    public static String getTimestamp() {
        return timestamp;
    }
}

I already tried to store the zones like this

ApplicationContext.zones = new ArrayList(zones);

but it had no effect. I already tried to put the zones attribute into another static class since ApplicationContext is loaded before all other classes (due to an entry in AndroidManifest) which could lead to such behavior but this isn't the problem too.

setData is invoked in my "ProcessController" twice. Once in doUpdateFromStorage, and once in doUpdateFromUrl(String). This class looks like this:

public final class ProcessController {
    private HttpClient httpClient = new HttpClient();

    public final InitializationResult initializeData()  {
        String urlTimestamp;
        try {
            urlTimestamp = getTimestampDataFromUrl();

            if (isModelEmpty())  {
                if (storageFilesExist())  {
                    try {
                        String localTimestamp = getLocalTimestamp();

                        if (isStorageDataUpToDate(localTimestamp, urlTimestamp))  {
                            return doDataUpdateFromStorage();
                        } 
                        else  {
                            return doDataUpdateFromUrl(urlTimestamp);
                        }
                    } 
                    catch (IOException e) {
                        return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.cannotReadTimestampFile());
                    }
                }
                else  {
                    try {
                        createNewFiles();

                        return doDataUpdateFromUrl(urlTimestamp);
                    } 
                    catch (IOException e) {
                        return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.fileCreationFailed());
                    }
                }
            }
            else  {
                if (isApplicationContextDataUpToDate(urlTimestamp))  {
                    return new InitializationResult(true, "");  
                }
                else  {
                    return doDataUpdateFromUrl(urlTimestamp);
                }
            }
        } 
        catch (IOException e1) {
            return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.noTimestampConnection());
        }
    }

    private String getTimestampDataFromUrl() throws IOException {
        if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
            throw new InterruptedIOException();
        }

        return httpClient.getDataFromUrl(FileType.TIMESTAMP);
    }

    private String getJsonDataFromUrl() throws IOException {
        if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
            throw new InterruptedIOException();
        }

        return httpClient.getDataFromUrl(FileType.JSONDATA);
    }

    private String getLocalTimestamp() throws IOException {
        if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
            throw new InterruptedIOException();
        }

        return PersistenceManager.getFileData(FileType.TIMESTAMP);
    }

    private List<Zone> getLocalJsonData() throws IOException, ParseException {
        if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
            throw new InterruptedIOException();
        }

        return JsonStringParser.parse(PersistenceManager.getFileData(FileType.JSONDATA));
    }

    private InitializationResult doDataUpdateFromStorage() throws InterruptedIOException {
        if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
            throw new InterruptedIOException();
        }

        try {
            ApplicationContext.setData(getLocalTimestamp(), getLocalJsonData());

            return new InitializationResult(true, "");
        } 
        catch (IOException e) {
            return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.cannotReadJsonFile());
        } 
        catch (ParseException e) {
            return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.parseError());
        }
    }

    private InitializationResult doDataUpdateFromUrl(String urlTimestamp) throws InterruptedIOException {
        if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
            throw new InterruptedIOException();
        }

        String jsonData;
        List<Zone> zones;
        try {
            jsonData = getJsonDataFromUrl();
            zones = JsonStringParser.parse(jsonData);

            try {
                PersistenceManager.persist(jsonData, FileType.JSONDATA);
                PersistenceManager.persist(urlTimestamp, FileType.TIMESTAMP);

                ApplicationContext.setData(urlTimestamp, zones);

                return new InitializationResult(true, "");
            } 
            catch (IOException e) {
                return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.filePersistError());
            }
        } 
        catch (IOException e) {
            return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.noJsonConnection());
        } 
        catch (ParseException e) {
            return new InitializationResult(false, Errors.parseError());
        }
    }

    private boolean isModelEmpty()  {
        if (ApplicationContext.getZones() == null || ApplicationContext.getZones().isEmpty())  {    
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

    private boolean isApplicationContextDataUpToDate(String urlTimestamp) { 
        if (ApplicationContext.getTimestamp() == null)  {
            return false;
        }

        String localTimestamp = ApplicationContext.getTimestamp();

        if (!localTimestamp.equals(urlTimestamp))  {
            return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

    private boolean isStorageDataUpToDate(String localTimestamp, String urlTimestamp) { 
        if (localTimestamp.equals(urlTimestamp))  {
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

    private boolean storageFilesExist()  {
        return PersistenceManager.filesExist();
    }

    private void createNewFiles() throws IOException {
        PersistenceManager.createNewFiles();
    }
}

Maybe it's another helpful information, that this ProcessController is invoked by my MainActivity's AsyncTask at the app setup:

public class InitializationTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, InitializationResult> {
    private ProcessController processController = new ProcessController();
    private ProgressDialog progressDialog;
    private MainActivity mainActivity;
    private final String TAG = this.getClass().getSimpleName();

    public InitializationTask(MainActivity mainActivity) {
        this.mainActivity = mainActivity;
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPreExecute() {
        super.onPreExecute();

        ProcessNotification.setCancelled(false);

        progressDialog = new ProgressDialog(mainActivity);
        progressDialog.setMessage("Processing.\nPlease wait...");
        progressDialog.setIndeterminate(true); //means that the "loading amount" is not measured.
        progressDialog.setCancelable(true);
        progressDialog.show();
    };

    @Override
    protected InitializationResult doInBackground(Void... params) {
        return processController.initializeData();
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(InitializationResult result) {
        super.onPostExecute(result);

        progressDialog.dismiss();

        if (result.isValid())  {
            mainActivity.finalizeSetup();
        }
        else  {
            AlertDialog.Builder dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(mainActivity);
            dialog.setTitle("Error on initialization");
            dialog.setMessage(result.getReason());
            dialog.setPositiveButton("Ok",
                    new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                        @Override
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                            dialog.cancel();

                            mainActivity.finish();
                        }
                    });

            dialog.show();
        }

        processController = null;
    }

    @Override
    protected void onCancelled() {
        super.onCancelled();

        Log.i(TAG, "onCancelled executed");
        Log.i(TAG, "set CancelNotification status to cancelled.");

        ProcessNotification.setCancelled(true);

        progressDialog.dismiss();

        try {
            Log.i(TAG, "clearing files");

            PersistenceManager.clearFiles();

            Log.i(TAG, "files cleared");
        } 
        catch (IOException e) {
            Log.e(TAG, "not able to clear files.");
        }

        processController = null;

        mainActivity.finish();
    }
}

Here is the body of the JSONParser. (UPDATE: I set the method none static but the problem persists.) I omit the object creations from the JSON objects since I don't think that this is the error:

public class JsonStringParser {
    private static String TAG = JsonStringParser.class.getSimpleName();

    public static synchronized List<Zone> parse(String jsonString) throws ParseException, InterruptedIOException {
        JSONParser jsonParser = new JSONParser();

        Log.i(TAG, "start parsing JSON String with length " + ((jsonString != null) ? jsonString.length() : "null"));
          List<Zone> zones = new ArrayList<Zone>();

        //does a lot of JSON parsing here

        Log.i(TAG, "finished parsing JSON String");

        jsonParser = null;

        return zones;
    }
}

Here is the heap dump which shows the problem:

Memory chart

This is the details list which shows that this problem has something to do with the arraylist.

detail

Any ideas what's wrong here? Btw: I don't know what's the other leak since there is no details information.

Maybe important: This diagram show the status when I don't start and stop the application over and over again. It's a diagram of a clean start. But when I start and stop several times it could lead to problems due to lack of space.

Here is a diagram of a real crash. I started and stopped the app while initialization several times:

crash report

[UPDATE]
I narrowed it down a bit by not storing the Android context into my ApplicationContext class and making PersistenceManager non-static. The problem hasn't changed, so I'm absolutely sure that it is not related to the fact that I store the Android context globally. It's still "Problem Suspect 1" of the graph above. So I have to do something with this huge list, but what? I already tried to serialize it, but unseralizing this list takes much longer than 20secs, so this is not an option.

Now I tried something different. I kicked out the whole ApplicationContext so I don't have any static references anymore. I tried to hold the ArrayList of Zone objects in MainActivity. Although I refactored at least the parts I need to make the application run, so I didn't even pass the Array or the Activity to all classes where I need it, I still have the same problem in a different manner, so my guess is that the Zone objects itself are somehow the problem. Or I cannot read the heap dump properly. See the new graphs below. This is the result of a simple app start without interference.

[UPDATE]
I came to the conclusion that there is no memory leak, because "the memory is accumulated in one instance" doesn't sound like a leak. The problem is that starting and stopping over and over again starts new AsyncTasks, as seen on one graph, so the solution would be to not start new AsyncTask. I found a possible solution on SO but it doesn't work for me yet.

memory error 4 memory error 5

share|improve this question
    
The "..tedious passing references by constructor" is what helps avoid issues like this. Honestly, using statics in this way is certainly one way to create memory leaks like this, especially with a static reference to your context. You need to show where you call setData and what your passing in to it. This may help someone with your memory leak problem. –  Emile Dec 11 '12 at 18:02
    
@Emile Ok I added additional information. –  Bevor Dec 11 '12 at 18:28
    
Can it be the private MainActivity mainActivity; holded by your AsyncTask that occurs the memory leak? Have you tried to set it at null after the end of the AsyncTask? –  ol_v_er Dec 12 '12 at 8:43
    
@ol_v_er Thanks for the hint, I will try that when I'm at home tonight. –  Bevor Dec 12 '12 at 9:25
    
Sorry, didn't work. Same result. –  Bevor Dec 12 '12 at 19:42
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5 Answers

First of all, I have to agree with Emile:

The "..tedious passing references by constructor" is what helps avoid issues like this. Honestly, using statics in this way is certainly one way to create memory leaks like this, especially with a static reference to your context.

This also applies to all those other static methods in your code. static methods are not really different from global functions. You are building a big spaghetti plate full of static methods there. Especially when they start sharing some state it will sooner or later crash or create obscure results which you wouldn't get with a proper design, especially in the presence of a highly multi-threadable platform as Android.

What also catched my eye is, please note that the onCancelled method of the AsyncTask will not be called before doInBackground has finished. So your global cancelation flag (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) is more or less worthless (if only used in the shown code passages).

Also from the memory images you posted, the zones list contains "only" 31 items. How much is it supposed to hold? By how much does it increase? If it actually increases, the culprint might be in the JsonStringParser.parse method, which is again static. If it holds a list of items in some cache and the control logic is not working correctly (for example in the presence of multiple threads accessing it at the same time), it might add items to that cache each time it is called.

  • Guess 1: As the parsing method is static, this data is not (necessarily) cleaned when the application is shut down. statics are initialized once and for the purpose of this case never de-initialized until the (physical vm-)process is stopped. Android does not guarantee that the process is killed however, even if the application is stopped (see for example a wonderful explanation here). Therefore you might accumulate some data in some static part of your (maybe parsing) code.
  • Guess 2: Since you are re-starting your application several times, you have the background thread running several times in parallel (assumption: each time you restart the application a new thread is spawned. Note that your code shows no guards against this.) This the first parsing is still running, another one is started since the global zones variables still holds no values. The global function parse might not be thread-safe and put several data multiple times into the list which is eventually returned, yielding a bigger and bigger list. Again this is generally avoided by not having static methods (and be aware of multi-threading).

(The code is not complete, therefore guesses, there might even be other things lurking there.)

share|improve this answer
    
There are not more than about 20 - 30 entries, but these objects are really big since they hold GeoJSON data of a whole city. The logic itself works perfect. I don't any data multiple times, but you are right with one: When I start and stop oder and over again, JsonStringParser.parse starts again after thread 1 is finished, but the logic can deal with that. Unfortunately I didn't find a way how to kill JsonStringParser.parse. This would be the best I can do since this parsing takes about 20sec. I'm adding the class body of the parser, maybe it's helpful. –  Bevor Dec 11 '12 at 19:45
    
From the second memory image, you can see, that not the zones list is your problem, as it still has the same size, and the size is consistent with what you report. You want to find out, what AsyncTask takes the 3.8 MB of memory, and what it uses it for. But even 6.8 MB of memory in total doesn't sound exorbitantly much. Most devices should be able to have at least 16 MB of heap space available. –  Stephan Dec 11 '12 at 20:44
    
It crashes always at the same positions. Either when I read from Url or while doing file operations. Before I read the JSON data (a really huge one liner) via readLine. Then I refactored it to read it block wise. This helped a little bit but not when I start and stop it a lot. I hope I get rid of it when this problem here is solved. I wonder why it crashes at all since I set the heap to the minimum of 16MB. The best would be to kill all threads, and start them again, but I can't cancel the parsing process. I just can take care that it doesn't make inconsistencies, at least this works. –  Bevor Dec 11 '12 at 20:57
    
Well the isCancelled() (of the AsyncTask) method will return true as soon as it was cancelled (and doInBackground() is still running). So checking it during the parsing steps (if that is possible) and throwing an exception if it is true might be a solution? –  Stephan Dec 11 '12 at 21:24
    
I already implemented this. I don't see any improvement because the Garbage Collection is what takes so long. It has to clean ten thousands of objects while parsing. This is what takes the most of time while this process. –  Bevor Dec 12 '12 at 8:04
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Inside your AsyncTask, you own a reference on a Context : MainActivity. When you start several AsyncTask, they are gonna be queued by an ExecutorService. So all the AsyncTask, if they are long running, will be "alive" (not garbage collected). And each of them will keep a reference on an Activity. Consequently, all you activities are gonna be kept alive as well.

This is a real memory leak as Android will want to garbage collect an Activity that is not displayed any more. And your AsyncTasks will prevent that. All the activities are kept in memory.

I encourage you to try RoboSpice Motivations to learn more about this problem. In this app we explain why you should not use AsyncTasks for long running operations. There are still a few work around that enable you to use them, but they are difficult to implement.

One way to get rid of this problem is to use WeakReference to point to your Activities inside your AsyncTask class. If you use them carefully, you can then avoid your activities not to be garbage collected.

Actually, RoboSpice is a library that allows to execute Network requests inside a service. This approach is quite interesting has it will create a context (a service) that is not linked to your activities. Thus, your request can take as long as they want and don't interfere with the garbage collection behavior of Android.

There are two modules of RoboSpice that you can use to deal with REST request. One for Spring Android and the other one for Google Http Java Client. Both libs will ease JSON parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
I just refactored my context out of my ApplicationContext class, but I still have all the same problems. Maybe I have to get rid of the whole ApplicationContext, but I will give WeakReference a try. Otherwise I have no other possibilities. Because I don't know if it's easily possible at all to pass my whole ArrayList I get from JsonParser and PersistenceManager through the AsyncTask up to all upper classes which uses them. –  Bevor Dec 15 '12 at 8:12
    
I found this entry which describes that it is not recommended to use WeakReference anymore, but I'm not sure if this is only meant for BitMaps: github.com/nostra13/Android-Universal-Image-Loader/issues/53 –  Bevor Dec 15 '12 at 8:47
    
I can't say about this new feature of Dalvik, but definitly it solved most of our memory leaks to use WeakReferences. The idea is that you should never keep a reference on a Context directly. –  Snicolas Dec 15 '12 at 9:59
    
Did you really change your AsyncTask so that it doesn't hold any reference on any context (i.e. Activities) ? I couldn't understand what you did clearly. –  Snicolas Dec 15 '12 at 10:00
    
I decided to give RoboSpice a try. I'm not sure how else to do this in a clean way. –  Bevor Dec 18 '12 at 11:17
show 4 more comments

I assume you fixed the reference to MainActivity, but I'd like to mention another problem ...

You state that the parsing takes 20sec. And if you "interrupt" the app, this processing does not go away.

From the code you show here it seems 99% of that 20sec is spent inside JsonStringParser.parse().

If I look at your comment "does a lot of JSON parsing here", I assume your app makes a call into JSONParser.something() that stays away for 20sec. Even though JsonStringParser is static, each call to JsonStringParser.parse() creates a new copy of JSONParser() and my guess is that uses a lot of memory.

A background process that takes 20sec is a really big task, and in what I have seen with JSON parsers, in this time a lot of objects get created and destroyed and a lot of cycles get consumed.

So I think your root cause here is that you start a second (or third or fourth) copy of JSONParser.something(), because each of them will execute independently and try to allocate many chunks of memory, and stay running even longer than 20sec because they will have to share the CPU cycles. The combined memory allocation of multiple JSONParser objects is what kills your system.

To summarize:

  • Do not start another JsonStringParser.parse() until the first one is killed or completed.
  • This means you must find a way to stop JsonStringParser.parse() when you "interrupt" the app, or reuse the running copy when you restart the app.
share|improve this answer
    
You are right and I know that this is the problem, because GC has to destroy hundred thousands of objects. The solution would probably be to not start another AsyncTask but to "join" the running one. I already found how to do that but it doesn't work yet. –  Bevor Dec 16 '12 at 8:58
    
For that also you can find an example in RoboSpice Motivation source code. We provided 2 implementations for joining a started AsyncTask. But you should really consider using RoboSpice, it does all this for you and it's much more reausable as a solution than hacking AsyncTask and making it work the way it should have been working to support such long running tasks. You will just end up with working code but nothing you can easily reuse in other apps / activities. –  Snicolas Dec 16 '12 at 9:31
    
Bevor, since the AsyncTask always stores the output in the Application object (some minor changes required), you could simply use a semaphore that tracks that it runs. That way, when the Main Activity loads, you only start the AsyncTask if one is not already running. –  gabriel Dec 16 '12 at 16:21
    
Bevor, Adding to above comment, an easy way to tell the mainActivity that JsonStringParser.parse() is complete is as follows: Completely remove the reference to MainActivity in InitializationTask and replace this with a WEAK reference in ApplicationContext. Make sure that MainActivty updates that reference in onCreate() so that InitializationTask can notify the most current MainActivity when it completes its processing. –  gabriel Dec 16 '12 at 16:35
    
@Snicolas I feel like breaking a fly on a wheel when using a framework for doing simple AsyncTask implementation. –  Bevor Dec 17 '12 at 13:54
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THink i see how it might be possible, my eyes have gone crossed eyed looking though.

Check that your not loading the data from your local storage, adding more data to it and then saving it back to local disk.

Something around the following methods in combination with other parts of your program.

If the following was called, and then you call getDatafromURL for some reason, then i believe you'd continually grow your data set.

That would be my starting point at least. Loading, appending and saving.

ApplicationContext.setData(getLocalTimestamp(), getLocalJsonData());

private List<Zone> getLocalJsonData() throws IOException, ParseException {
    if (ProcessNotification.isCancelled()) {
        throw new InterruptedIOException();
    }

    return JsonStringParser.parse(PersistenceManager.getFileData(FileType.JSONDATA));
}

Otherwise i think the problem lies in either your Parsing code, or perhaps one of the static classes your using to save the data.

share|improve this answer
    
What exactly do you mean by "Check that your not loading the data from your local storage, adding more data to it and then saving it back to local disk." I don't understand that step. –  Bevor Dec 12 '12 at 19:48
    
Having looked again i dont think thats the cause, unless your amending data to the local storage file rather than overwriting it. Do you nullify httpclient anywhere? –  Emile Dec 13 '12 at 8:09
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

MY FINAL SOLUTION

I found a solution on my own now. It runs stable and doesn't produce memory leaks when I start and stop the application a lot of times. Another advantage with this solution is that I was able to kick out all this ProcessNotification.isCancelled() parts.

The key is to hold a reference to my InitializationTask in my ApplicationContext. With this approach I can resume the running AsyncTask in a new MainActivity when I start a new one. This means that I never start more than one AsyncTask but I attach every new MainActivity instance to the currently running task. The old Activity will be detached. This looks like this:

new methods in ApplicationContext:

public static void register(InitializationTask initializationTask) {
    ApplicationContext.initializationTask = initializationTask;
}

public static void unregisterInitializationTask()  { 
    initializationTask = null;
}

public static InitializationTask getInitializationTask() {
    return initializationTask;
}

MainActivity
(I have to put the progressDialog in here, otherwise it wouldn't be shown if I stop and start a new Activity):

@Override
protected void onStart() {
    super.onStart();

    progressDialog = new ProgressDialog(this);
    progressDialog.setMessage("Processing.\nPlease wait...");
    progressDialog.setIndeterminate(true); // means that the "loading amount" is not measured.
    progressDialog.setCancelable(true);
    progressDialog.show();

    if (ApplicationContext.getInitializationTask() == null) {
        initializationTask = new InitializationTask();
        initializationTask.attach(this);

        ApplicationContext.register(initializationTask);

        initializationTask.execute((Void[]) null);
    } 
    else {
        initializationTask = ApplicationContext.getInitializationTask();

        initializationTask.attach(this);
    }
}

MainActivity's "onPause" contains initializationTask.detach(); and progressDialog.dismiss();. finalizeSetup(); dismisses the dialog too.

InitializationTask contains two more methods:

public void attach(MainActivity mainActivity) {
    this.mainActivity = mainActivity;
}

public void detach() {
    mainActivity = null;
}

onPostExecute of the task invokes ApplicationContext.unregisterInitializationTask();.

share|improve this answer
    
That solution is nice. Actually it's very close to something that has been discussed on this thread : stackoverflow.com/questions/3357477/…. Nevertheless, the problem is that this solution can hardly be reused without a lot of copy-paste // boiler-plate code. It will work, but you can't really capitalize on this solution. –  Snicolas Dec 24 '12 at 8:12
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