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I'm trying to create a build system for my project which will be based on scons.

The project consist of several directories, each holding part of the whole project.
Each directory hold the sources of either a shared library, a program or a process (daemon).
One directory (bin) holds all shared libraries and all executables.

Most of the directories already contain a sconscript file (named Sconstruct) which builds the directory's module (lib / executable) and put it in the bin directory.

Now I want to create one more sconscript - to rule them all..
In the parent directory I want a sconscript that builds all libraries and executables of the project, so that after I change a few sources here and there I can run scons from the parent directory and all affected modules will be re-built.

I tried a few ways, and they all failed.
I'm quite a noob in the scons business, and I susspect this is the root cause of my failures, but I'm sure this problem was solved many times by other, more experienced, developers - as the situation I described is quite common.

So, any suggestions are welcomed!

EDIT:

My current Sconstruct in the parent directory looks like this:

import os  
env = os.environ  
Export('env', 'os')  

SConscript([  
'Server1_Dir/Sconstruct',  
'Server2_Dir/Sconstruct',  
'Server3_Dir/Sconstruct'  
])

The Sconstructs in the sub-directories (I know they should be called Sconscript) start with:

import os  
Import('env')  
home=env.get('HOME')  

So it seems to me that I'm using the same environment for all scripts, though I'm getting a lot of:

scons: warning: Two different environments were specified for target....  

warnings, which are unclear for me.
It's also worth noting that not all server-combinations in the main script yield these warnings - some may leave together peacefully, but not all.
It does seem to me that this is the right way to go, but I can't find a way to get rid of those warnings (and their root cause).

Thanks.

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Seems, you need to refactor your build-system from many sconstruct files to one. I didn't see other ways. –  Torsten Dec 9 '12 at 18:53
    
@Torsten Actually, the only other way is with a hierarchical build as explained in my answer. Putting everything into one script could be quite messy. –  Brady Dec 9 '12 at 19:22
    
Yes, hierarchical build is available only if do refactorting. –  Torsten Dec 10 '12 at 18:28
    
You seem to be confusing the concept of a SCons Environment with the os.environ map. You dont need to Export/Import the os.environ (docs.python.org/2/library/os.html), and instead Export/Import the SCons Environment. (scons.org/doc/production/HTML/scons-user/c1385.html) The SCons Environment is where you create all the SCons targets, etc. Can you display more of the SConstruct/SConscript's –  Brady Dec 17 '12 at 6:49
    
Thanks for your time, Brady. I'll try to be more specific in a new "answer" in this thread, as the original question starts getting a bit cluttered. –  Ash Dec 17 '12 at 12:45
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2 Answers 2

What you want to do is called a hierarchical build as described here. In SCons, there can only be one SConstruct per project.

The way to create a hierarchical build in SCons is to make the root SCons script be the SConstruct, and the subdirectory SCons scripts be called SConscript. The root SConstruct script "loads" the subdirectory SConscripts using the SConscript() function described in the above link.

Here's an example assuming you have a root SConstruct and a lib and bin subdir:

SConstruct

env = Environment()

SConscript('lib/SConscript', exports='env')
SConscript('bin/SConscript', exports='env')

lib/SConscript

Import('env')
env.Library('yourlib', ['yourLibSource.cc'])

bin/SConscript

Import('env')
env.Program('yourbin', ['yourBinSource.cc'])
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Brady. I tried that, and I'm getting a ton of scons: warning: Two different environments were specified for target. This is actually where I gave up and turned here for help. I suppose it happens because I'm using the same libs in a few modules, but that's the whole idea... Any idea how to overcome this warning ? –  Ash Dec 10 '12 at 9:20
    
@user1860085, Sounds like you're creating multiple Environment()'s when you actually only need one. I'll update the answer with an example of how to create just one env for a hierarchical build. –  Brady Dec 10 '12 at 14:12
    
Sorry for the delayed response.. Brady, I believe I was doing the equivalent to what you've suggested. I'll edit my question to add what I'm doing. Thanks again :-) –  Ash Dec 16 '12 at 12:22
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My scripts, before I tried to unify them, looked like the following (and worked properly):

Librarry building-script Stracture:

  1. Environment and Definitions:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    import os  
    env = os.environ  
    home = env.get('HOME')  
    projects = []  
    third_parties_projects = []  
    my_rpath = []
    
  2. Preparing lists of paths and files:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    all_user_implemented_libs = os.path.join(home,"Project/lib/")  
    my_rpath.append("/path/to/lib/dir/")  
    
    projects.append(os.path.join(home,"Project/library_1/"))  
    projects.append(os.path.join(home,"Project/library_2/"))  
    ...  
    
    third_parties_projects.append("/opt/some_product/include/")  
    ...  
    
    so_files = Split("""  
        source_1.cpp  
        source_2.cpp  
        ...  
                """)
    
  3. Controlling the build:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    myprog = Environment(CXXFLAGS = flags, ENV = env, CPPPATH = projects + third_parties_projects + ['.'], RPATH = my_rpath)  
    myprog.Decider('MD5')  
    mylib = myprog.SharedLibrary(all_user_implemented_libs + 'lib_name', so_files)  
    myprog.Default(mylib)  
    

Process building-script Stracture:

  1. Environment and Definitions:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    import os  
    env = os.environ  
    home = env.get('HOME')  
    projects = []  
    third_parties_projects = []  
    user_libpaths = []  
    my_rpath = []
    
  2. Preparing lists of paths and files:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    projects.append(os.path.join(home,"Project/library_1/"))  
    projects.append(os.path.join(home,"Project/library_2/"))  
    ....  
    
    my_rpath.append("/path/to/lib/dir/")  
    third_parties_projects.append("/opt/some_product/include/")  
    ...  
    
    all_user_implemented_bins = os.path.join(home,"Project/bin/")  
    all_user_implemented_libs = os.path.join(home,"Project/lib/")  
    
    flags = ''  
    
    libs = Split("""  
        lib_1  
        lib_2  
        ...  
                 """)  
    
    third_party_libpaths.append("/opt/some_product/")  
    ...  
    
    source_ext_files = Split("""  
        ext_source_1.cpp  
        ...  
            """)  
    
    source_files_for_executable = Split("""  
        source_1.cpp  
        sosurce_2.cpp  
        ...  
            """)  
    
    user_libpaths.append(all_user_implemented_libs)
    
  3. Building the underlaying libs:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    for project in projects:  
        SConscript(project+'/Sconstruct')
    
  4. Controlling the build:
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    myprog = Environment(CXXFLAGS = flags, ENV = env, CPPPATH = projects + third_parties_projects + ['.'], RPATH = my_rpath)  
    myprog.Decider('MD5')  
    my_prog = myprog.Program(all_user_implemented_bins + 'process_name', source_files_for_executable + source_ext_files, LIBS = libs, LIBPATH = third_party_libpaths + user_libpaths)  
    myprog.Default(my_prog)
    

These scripts are scattered each in its corresponding lib/exec directory, and work fine when executed separately.
Now I want to add one more script (like the one in the original question) in the parent directory which will build the whole product - all executables and all underlaying libraries - as necessary.

Thanks.

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