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The question is complicated but I will explain it in details.

The goal is to make a function which will return next "step" of the given string.

For example

String.Step("a"); //  = "b"
String.Step("b"); //  = "c"
String.Step("g"); //  = "h"
String.Step("z"); // = "A"
String.Step("A"); // = "B"
String.Step("B"); // = "C"
String.Step("G"); // = "H"

Until here its quite easy, But taking in mind that input IS string it can contain more than 1 characters and the function must behave like this.

String.Step("Z"); // = "aa";
String.Step("aa"); // = "ab";
String.Step("ag"); // = "ah";
String.Step("az"); // = "aA";
String.Step("aA"); // = "aB";
String.Step("aZ"); // = "ba"; 
String.Step("ZZ"); // = "aaa";

and so on...

This doesn't exactly need to extend the base String class.

I tried to work it out by each characters ASCII values but got stuck with strings containing 2 characters.

I would really appreciate if someone can provide full code of the function.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT *I'm sorry I forgot to mention earlier that the function "reparse" the self generated string when its length reaches n.

continuation of this function will be smth like this. for example n = 3
String.Step("aaa"); // = "aab";
String.Step("aaZ"); // = "aba";
String.Step("aba"); // = "abb";
String.Step("abb"); // = "abc";
String.Step("abZ"); // = "aca";
.....
String.Step("zzZ"); // = "zAa";
String.Step("zAa"); // = "zAb";
........

I'm sorry I didn't mention it earlier, after reading some answers I realised that the problem was in question.

Without this the function will always produce character "a" n times after the end of the step.

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4  
Why not post what you have tried? –  Daniel Elliott Sep 4 '09 at 12:49
    
The input is always a-zA-Z –  George Sep 4 '09 at 13:17
    
I'm sorry i forgot to add the main question :S. Question edited. –  George Sep 4 '09 at 13:18

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

NOTE: This answer is incorrect, as "aa" should follow after "Z"... (see comments below)

Here is an algorithm that might work:

each "string" represents a number to a given base (here: twice the count of letters in the alphabet).

The next step can thus be computed by parsing the "number"-string back into a int, adding 1 and then formatting it back to the base.

Example:

"a" == 1 -> step("a") == step(1) == 1 + 1 == 2 == "b"

Now your problem is reduced to parsing the string as a number to a given base and reformatting it. A quick googling suggests this page: http://everything2.com/title/convert+any+number+to+decimal

How to implement this?

  • a lookup table for letters to their corresponding number: a=1, b=2, c=3, ... Y = ?, Z = 0
  • to parse a string to number, read the characters in reverse order, looking up the numbers and adding them up:
    • "ab" -> 2*BASE^0 + 1*BASE^1
    • with BASE being the number of "digits" (2 count of letters in alphabet, is that 48?)

EDIT: This link looks even more promising: http://www.citidel.org/bitstream/10117/20/12/convexp.html

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please explain it more briefly like posting a pseudo code or if possible full one. Thanks –  George Sep 4 '09 at 12:54
1  
It isn't actually that simple, which letter represents 0, a? What is the int value of "a" and what is the int value of "aa"? –  AnthonyWJones Sep 4 '09 at 12:55
    
@Anthony: From the examples in the question, I think it's simply reversed Base52. a=0, A=26, aa=52 –  dtb Sep 4 '09 at 13:07
    
+1! great answer –  ArsenMkrt Sep 4 '09 at 13:08
1  
@dtb: If you want to treat the "digits" as Base52 then "a" represents the digit 0 in all columns hence a=0 and aa=00 and aaa=000. You cannot treat this sequence as a simple number base. Consider in decimal 00 == 0 however in the OPs question aa != a != aaa –  AnthonyWJones Sep 4 '09 at 13:36

Quite collection of approaches, here is mine:-

The Function:

private static string IncrementString(string s)
{
  byte[] vals = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(s);
  for (var i = vals.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
  {
    if (vals[i] < 90)
    {
      vals[i] += 1;
      break;
    }
    if (vals[i] == 90)
    {
      if (i != 0)
      {
        vals[i] = 97;
        continue;
      }
      else
      {
        return new String('a', vals.Length + 1); 
      }
    }

    if (vals[i] < 122)
    {
      vals[i] += 1;
      break;
    }

    vals[i] = 65;
    break;
  }

  return System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(vals);
}

The Tests

Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("a") == "b");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("z") == "A");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("Z") == "aa");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("aa") == "ab");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("az") == "aA");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("aZ") == "ba");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("zZ") == "Aa");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("Za") == "Zb");
Console.WriteLine(IncrementString("ZZ") == "aaa");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for fancy loops - I prefer my recursive function more ;) –  iAn Sep 4 '09 at 13:56
public static class StringStep
{
    public static string Next(string str)
    {
        string result = String.Empty;
        int index = str.Length - 1;
        bool carry;
        do
        {
            result = Increment(str[index--], out carry) + result;              
        }
        while (carry && index >= 0);
        if (index >= 0) result = str.Substring(0, index+1) + result;
        if (carry) result = "a" + result;
        return result;
    }

    private static char Increment(char value, out bool carry)
    {
        carry = false;
        if (value >= 'a' && value < 'z' || value >= 'A' && value < 'Z')
        {
            return (char)((int)value + 1);
        }
        if (value == 'z') return 'A';
        if (value == 'Z')
        {
            carry = true;
            return 'a';
        }
        throw new Exception(String.Format("Invalid character value: {0}", value));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. I like this one the best (even better than mine), a) cos it works (passes my set of tests anyway), b) the operation is clearer and c) intrinsically contains some defensive code. Nice one. ;) –  AnthonyWJones Sep 4 '09 at 13:47
    
Thanks, first of all I wanted it to be readable and easy to understand. –  empi Sep 4 '09 at 13:51

Split the input string into columns and process each, right-to-left, like you would if it was basic arithmetic. Apply whatever code you've got that works with a single column to each column. When you get a Z, you 'increment' the next-left column using the same algorithm. If there's no next-left column, stick in an 'a'.

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I'm sorry the question is stated partly. I edited the question so that it meets the requirements, without the edit the function would end up with a n times by step by step increasing each word from lowercase a to uppercase z without "re-parsing" it.

Please consider re-reading the question, including the edited part

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This is what I came up with. I'm not relying on ASCII int conversion, and am rather using an array of characters. This should do precisely what you're looking for.

    public static string Step(this string s)
    {
        char[] stepChars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ".ToCharArray();

        char[] str = s.ToCharArray();
        int idx = s.Length - 1;

        char lastChar = str[idx];


        for (int i=0; i<stepChars.Length; i++)
        {
            if (stepChars[i] == lastChar)
            {
                if (i == stepChars.Length - 1)
                {
                    str[idx] = stepChars[0];
                    if (str.Length > 1)
                    {
                        string tmp = Step(new string(str.Take(str.Length - 1).ToArray()));
                        str = (tmp + str[idx]).ToCharArray();
                    }
                    else
                        str = new char[] { stepChars[0], str[idx] };
                }
                else
                    str[idx] = stepChars[i + 1];

                break;
            }
        }

        return new string(str);
    }
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This is a special case of a numeral system. It has the base of 52. If you write some parser and output logic you can do any kind of arithmetics an obviously the +1 (++) here. The digits are "a"-"z" and "A" to "Z" where "a" is zero and "Z" is 51

So you have to write a parser who takes the string and builds an int or long from it. This function is called StringToInt() and is implemented straight forward (transform char to number (0..51) multiply with 52 and take the next char)

And you need the reverse function IntToString which is also implementet straight forward (modulo the int with 52 and transform result to digit, divide the int by 52 and repeat this until int is null)

With this functions you can do stuff like this: IntToString( StringToInt("ZZ") +1 ) // Will be "aaa"

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1  
Not that simple. There is no "zero digit" since a != aa != aaa. Can't use Z either because aZ != ZaZ –  jnylen Sep 4 '09 at 17:36

You need to account for A) the fact that capital letters have a lower decimal value in the Ascii table than lower case ones. B) The table is not continuous A-Z-a-z - there are characters inbetween Z and a.

public static string stepChar(string str)
{
  return stepChar(str, str.Length - 1);
}

public static string stepChar(string str, int charPos)
{
  return stepChar(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(str), charPos);
}

public static string stepChar(byte[] strBytes, int charPos)
{
  //Escape case 
  if (charPos < 0)
  {
    //just prepend with a and return
    return "a" + Encoding.ASCII.GetString(strBytes);
  }
  else
  {

    strBytes[charPos]++;

    if (strBytes[charPos] == 91)
    {
      //Z -> a plus increment previous char
      strBytes[charPos] = 97;
      return stepChar(strBytes, charPos - 1);                }
    else
    {
      if (strBytes[charPos] == 123)
      {
        //z -> A 
        strBytes[charPos] = 65;
      }

      return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(strBytes);
    }
  }
}

You'll probably want some checking in place to ensure that the input string only contains chars A-Za-z


Edit Tidied up code and added new overload to remove redundant byte[] -> string -> byte[] conversion

Proof

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This is a lot like how Excel columns would work if they were unbounded. You could change 52 to reference chars.Length for easier modification.

static class AlphaInt {
    private static string chars =
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";

    public static string StepNext(string input) {
        return IntToAlpha(AlphaToInt(input) + 1);
    }

    public static string IntToAlpha(int num) {
        if(num-- <= 0) return "a";
        if(num % 52 == num) return chars.Substring(num, 1);
        return IntToAlpha(num / 52) + IntToAlpha(num % 52 + 1);
    }

    public static int AlphaToInt(string str) {
        int num = 0;
        for(int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++) {
            num += (chars.IndexOf(str.Substring(i, 1)) + 1)
                   * (int)Math.Pow(52, str.Length - i - 1);
        }
        return num;
    }
}
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LetterToNum should be be a Function that maps "a" to 0 and "Z" to 51. NumToLetter the inverse.

long x = "aazeiZa".Aggregate((x,y) => (x*52) + LetterToNum(y)) + 1;
string s = "";

do { // assertion: x > 0
    var c = x % 52;
    s = NumToLetter() + s;
    x = (x - c) / 52;
} while (x > 0)

// s now should contain the result
share|improve this answer
    
Again a Base52 based approach, this doesn't work. The first line will return 1 for "a" or "aa" or "aaa". –  AnthonyWJones Sep 4 '09 at 13:40
    
Indeed, missed the 52. –  Marcel Jackwerth Sep 4 '09 at 13:43

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