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Questions:

  1. Why does the first method correctly identify the object as Ferrari? (tested in Chrome)
  2. Am I doing inheritance correctly in the two methods?
  3. Am I correct in understanding that there are some hidden "constructor" properties in the first example, if so where are they, and what put them there? Are there any hidden constructor properties in the second example I didn't explicitly put in?
  4. Providing I have done inheritance correctly, which of the two methods at the end should I use to let the object be identified as a Ferrari? Or should I not care - after all "instanceof" still works?

Context:

Using JavaScript's "new" method for creating objects, works fine:

Vehicle.prototype = {}; // Not required I know
function Vehicle() {

}

Car.prototype = new Vehicle();
function Car() {

}

Ferrari.prototype = new Car();
function Ferrari() {

}
var o = new Ferrari();
console.log(o);

Which outputs:

> Ferrari
  > __proto__ : Car
    > __proto__ : Vehicle
      > __proto__ : Object <- The one that isn't required
        > __proto__ : Object <- Provided by JS
          ...
          hasOwnProperty: function hasOwnProperty() { [native code] }
          ...

Now I want to do the same thing avoiding the new keyword, here's what I've got:

Vehicle.prototype = {};
function Vehicle() {
  var vehicle = Object.create(Vehicle.prototype);
  return vehicle;
}

Car.prototype = Vehicle();
Car.prototype.constructor = Vehicle;
function Car() {
  var car = Object.create(Car.prototype);
  return car;
}

Ferrari.prototype = Car();
Ferrari.prototype.constructor = Car;

function Ferrari() {
  var ferrari = Object.create(Ferrari.prototype);
  //ferrari.constructor = Ferrari;  <- Lookey here - commented line
  return ferrari;
}

var o = new Ferrari();
console.log(o);

Which outputs:

> **Car**
  > __proto__ : Car
    > constructor : function Car()
      __proto__ : Vehicle
      > constructor : function Vehicle()
        __proto__ : Object <- The one that isn't required
        > __proto__ : Object
          ...
          hasOwnProperty: function hasOwnProperty() { [native code] }
          ...

Notice the first line of the output is now a Car, rather than Ferrari. That can be rectified by removing the commented line, or by changing the Ferrari's prototype as follows:

var realPrototype = Car();
realPrototype.constructor = Car;

Ferrari.prototype = Object.create(realPrototype);
Ferrari.prototype.constructor = Ferrari;
share|improve this question
1  
You're setting Ferrari.prototype.constructor to Car. But the point of resetting constructor is that instances of Ferrari have their constructor set back to Ferrari instead of Car (which happens automatically when overwriting prototype). –  pimvdb Dec 9 '12 at 18:31
    
@pimvdb the reason I didn't do that is because in the second method it would appear (in the object graph) that the prototype of Ferrari is a Ferrari, when in fact it is the "instance of a Car". Interestingly, when you do the same thing to the first method it doesn't change the graph at all! - The inconsistency suggests to me it's not the correct way of doing inheritance? –  Lee Dec 9 '12 at 19:12
    
@Lee This way of doing inheritance is fine, you just have to set the constructor of each subtype to the parent. You can either save yourself a bit of trouble and do this inside the function body, or you can reset the constructor each time you make a prototype for a subtype. See my answer. Also, the prototype of o is Ferrari, the prototype of Ferrari isn't Ferrari –  Asad Dec 9 '12 at 19:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why does the first method correctly identify the object as Ferrari? (tested in Chrome)

Am I correct in understanding that there are some hidden "constructor" properties in the first example, if so where are they, and what put them there? Are there any hidden constructor properties in the second example I didn't explicitly put in?

Yes, it seems Chrome sets a hidden "constructor" property if you assign to a function's prototype property, or create a new instance somehow. Haven't figured it out exactly.

Where they are? Probably some internal properties to which only console.log has access to. Yet, you seem to be able to overwrite them with an explicit "constructor" property, at least for the displaying of __proto__ objects.

I guess this is done by Chrome as many people forget to set the constructor property (because it's actually useless) when overwriting prototype objects, though it is recommended - see also JavaScript inheritance and the constructor property. Chrome Devs wanted to make a pretty log function that indicates the type of the object, so they needed to work around people's lazyness.

Am I doing inheritance correctly in the two methods?

There is no problem with inheritance in your code. Newly created Car instances have the aspired prototype chain, with both methods.

Though, there are some pitfalls. Don't use the new keyword to create prototype objects instances. You don't want full-fledged instances, with a constructor applied on them. Just use Car.prototype = Object.create(Vehicle.prototype); see also the answers on What is the reason to use the 'new' keyword here?

Also, you did not set the "constructor" properties, or did it wrong. That property, defined on prototype objects, is inherited by all objects created by a new call to the respective constructor function, and it should provide them a reference to exactly that function. This is done by default for any created function, see EcmaScript specification §13.2 steps 16-18.

If you reassign to fn.prototype, you overwrite that behaviour (regardless whether it's an object literal, a new construction or a Object.create call). Effectively, the "constructor" property is then inherited from an object higher up in the prototype chain - in your first example o.constructor is Object, inherited from the empty object literal. So, we need to reset it after the assignment, in your case:

Vehicle.prototype.constructor = Vehicle;
Car.prototype.constructor = Car;
Ferrari.prototype.constructor = Ferrari;

// or, we combine it with the Object.create call:
Car.prototype = Object.create(Vehicle.prototype, {
    constructor: {value:Car, configurable:true, writable:true}
});

Notice that there is no need to set it explicitly in the constructor (as in your second example), creating an extra property on the object. This is what inheritance is made for.

Or we don't care about "constructor" properties at all:

Which of the two methods at the end should I use to let the object be identified as a Ferrari? Or should I not care - after all "instanceof" still works?

To identify an object as a Ferrari always use instanceof. The "constructor" property is not reliable. It might have been forgotten to set, or it is not what you expected in a comparison: A "type check" like someObj.constructor === Car won't work for Ferraris or any other "subclasses" that have their constructor properties properly set. It does with instanceof.

share|improve this answer

Why does the first method correctly identify the object as Ferrari?

Because the constructor for the object o is the function Ferrari.

Am I doing inheritance correctly in the two methods?

You are doing it correctly in the first method, but not so correctly in the second.

Providing I have done inheritance correctly, which of the two methods at the end should I use to let the object be identified as a Ferrari? Or should I not care - after all "instanceof" still works?

For uniformity, you should be setting the constructor property on each prototype within the function body, so that you don't have to do:

Car.prototype = Vehicle();
Car.prototype.constructor = Vehicle;

Aeroplane.prototype = Vehicle();
Aeroplane.prototype.constructor = Vehicle;

...

Instead you should be using:

function Vehicle() {
    var vehicle = Object.create(Vehicle.prototype);
    vehicle.constructor = Vehicle;
    return vehicle;
}

Car.prototype = Vehicle();
function Car() {
    var car = Object.create(Car.prototype);
    car.constructor = Car;
    return car;
}

Ferrari.prototype = Car();
function Ferrari() {
    var ferrari = Object.create(Ferrari.prototype);
    ferrari.constructor = Ferrari;
    return ferrari;
}

var o = new Ferrari();
console.log(o);

This correctly results in a structure similar to the one in your first example.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't make much sense to me. Why set the property in the constructor when it can easily be inherited? –  Bergi Dec 9 '12 at 18:44
    
@Bergi The constructor property of the object you are using as a prototype needs to be reset each time in the code the OP has posted. For example, if I have 10 types of vehicles, each time I set the prototype of the new vehicle to Vehicle(), I would also need to do Motorcycle.prototype.constructor = Vehicle;. The way I'm doing it the constructor property is already set. –  Asad Dec 9 '12 at 18:50
    
Nah, Motorcycle.prototype.constructor should be Motorcycle. What I wanted to ask why you are doing car.constructor = Car (for each instance) instead of Car.prototype.constructor = Car (once). –  Bergi Dec 9 '12 at 18:58
    
@Bergi No, Motorcycle.prototype.constructor should be Vehicle. The constructor property of an Object's prototype should point to the function that created that prototype. To quote MDN (regarding constructor): Returns a reference to the Object function that created the instance's prototype. Car is an instance of a Vehicle, so its constructor is Vehicle. –  Asad Dec 9 '12 at 19:05
    
Doing Car.prototype.constructor = Car would do a completely different thing from car.constructor = Car. It would be incorrect to set the constructor of an instance to itself. Car is constructed by Vehicle, not by itself. –  Asad Dec 9 '12 at 19:10

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