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given a standard ISO 8601 timestamp, is there an easy way to get a time stamp from 20 minutes before and another time stamp of 20 minutes after the original timestamp?

For example given

 2010-01-25 18:02:00

I would want one or two functions to return, 2010-01-25 17:48:00 and 2010-01-25 18:22:00

The solution I gave up with is rather cumbersome, I use s.substr(14,2) to get the minutes and s.substr(12,2) to get the hours, convert the hour and minute strings to int and subtract or add the minute value with a condition if it goes above 60 or below 0. Is there a better/easier way to do this?

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What is the time 20 minutes after 2012-12-31 23:59:00 ? I guess there is no easy way. –  Bo Persson Dec 9 '12 at 18:47
    
@BoPersson yeah true i didn't even think of that case –  pyCthon Dec 9 '12 at 19:11
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You could:

  1. Convert the string into a struct tm using std::get_time.
  2. Modify the struct tm (no need to consider the ranges).
  3. Normalize the struct tm using mktime.
  4. Print the struct tm using std::put_time

#include <ctime>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>

std::string increase_minutes(const std::string& input, int delta) {
    struct tm tm;
    constexpr auto format = "%Y-%m-%d %T";

    std::istringstream iss (input);
    iss >> std::get_time(&tm, format);
    tm.tm_min += delta;
    mktime(&tm);

    std::ostringstream oss;
    oss << std::put_time(&tm, format);
    return oss.str();
}


int main() {
    auto s = "2012-12-31 23:59:00";
    std::cout << increase_minutes(s, 20) << std::endl;
    std::cout << increase_minutes(s, -20) << std::endl;
}

Note that std::get_time and std::put_time are absent in g++/libstdc++. You may need to parse the string using the C functions sscanf or strptime, and print the string using strftime. See also C++ date and time.


Edit: If we want to change by a generic std::chrono::duration, it is better we manipulate on a std::chrono::time_point directly. We could create a time_point from a struct tm with a two-step conversion: time_point ↔ time_t ↔ struct tm, as illustrated below:

#include <ctime>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <chrono>

template <typename R, typename P>
std::string increase_iso_time(const std::string& input, 
                              const std::chrono::duration<R, P>& duration) {
    struct tm tm;
    constexpr auto format = "%Y-%m-%d %T";

    std::istringstream iss (input);
    iss >> std::get_time(&tm, format);
    auto time = mktime(&tm);
    auto tp = std::chrono::system_clock::from_time_t(time);

    tp += duration;

    time = std::chrono::system_clock::to_time_t(tp);
    tm = *localtime(&time);
    std::ostringstream oss;
    oss << std::put_time(&tm, format);
    return oss.str();
}

int main() {
    auto s = "2012-12-31 23:59:00";
    std::cout << increase_iso_time(s, std::chrono::minutes(20)) << std::endl;
    std::cout << increase_iso_time(s, - std::chrono::hours(4)
                                      - std::chrono::minutes(20)) << std::endl;
}
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+1 Those C++11 time I/O manipulators sure are handy! One possible improvement: You could increase the type safety of increase_minutes by changing the type of delta to std::chrono::minutes. It does make the user code more verbose, but also makes it non-ambiguous as to what 20 actually means. On the other hand, the name of your function also strives to disambiguate the 20. So this isn't a huge deal, just another design decision. –  Howard Hinnant Dec 9 '12 at 19:34
    
@HowardHinnant: If we want to accept a std::duration, it would be better to convert that tm into a time_point. Updated the answer to show that. –  KennyTM Dec 9 '12 at 19:44
    
Yeah, that's the way I was thinking of doing it. But your original use of mktime to normalize the tm is elegant too. I'm sure both are overkill for a homework exercise. :-) If you really want to beat this horse to death, you could template on Rep and Period, making the parameter std::chrono::duration<Rep, Period>. That makes increase_iso_time not "overly generic" in the duration parameter. –  Howard Hinnant Dec 9 '12 at 19:58
    
wow this is really nice –  pyCthon Dec 9 '12 at 21:33
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Look up mktime() from the C or C++ standards. You'll need something like strptime() to convert the ISO 8601 time into a struct tm (or you can use sscanf(), or ...). Then make two copies of your structure, adjust the tm_min by +20 in one and -20 in the other, call mktime(), and then strftime().

This will work in C and C++98, C++2003 as well as C++2011. If you want it only to work with C++2011, then you need to go to std::chrono.

Sample code

This code is for C++ because of the headers, but could be converted to C by changing to <time.h> and <stdio.h>. Yes, it probably doesn't count as 'good' C++; it certainly leaves you with some interface decisions. But it does get the job done. (For pure C++, you can remove the references to struct.)

#include <ctime>
#include <cstdio>

static void delta_t(const char *otime, int delta)
{
    struct tm tm1;
    int n;
    if ((n = sscanf(otime, "%4d-%2d-%2d %2d:%2d:%2d", &tm1.tm_year, &tm1.tm_mon, &tm1.tm_mday,
                    &tm1.tm_hour, &tm1.tm_min, &tm1.tm_sec)) != 6)
    {
        printf("%s: failed %d\n", otime, n);
        return;
    }
    printf("%.4d-%.2d-%.2d %.2d:%.2d:%.2d\n", tm1.tm_year, tm1.tm_mon, tm1.tm_mday,
            tm1.tm_hour, tm1.tm_min, tm1.tm_sec);

    tm1.tm_isdst = -1;
    tm1.tm_year -= 1900;
    tm1.tm_mon--;
    struct tm tm2 = tm1;
    tm2.tm_min += delta;
    struct tm tm3 = tm1;
    tm3.tm_min -= delta;
    mktime(&tm2);
    mktime(&tm3);
    char dt1[20];
    char dt2[20];
    char dt3[20];
    strftime(dt1, sizeof(dt1), "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", &tm1);
    strftime(dt2, sizeof(dt2), "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", &tm2);
    strftime(dt3, sizeof(dt3), "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", &tm3);

    printf("Input: %s\n", otime);
    printf("Date1: %s\n", dt1);
    printf("Date2: %s\n", dt2);
    printf("Date3: %s\n", dt3);
}

int main(void)
{
    delta_t("2010-01-25 18:02:00", 20);
    delta_t("2012-12-31 23:59:00", 20);
    return(0);
}

Sample Output:

2010-01-25 18:02:00
Input: 2010-01-25 18:02:00
Date1: 2010-01-25 18:02:00
Date2: 2010-01-25 18:22:00
Date3: 2010-01-25 17:42:00
2012-12-31 23:59:00
Input: 2012-12-31 23:59:00
Date1: 2012-12-31 23:59:00
Date2: 2013-01-01 00:19:00
Date3: 2012-12-31 23:39:00
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