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I have a super class "Sam" and a sub-class "SubSam"

 public class Sam {

String msg;
String msg1;

Sam(String mm, String mm1) {
    msg = mm;
    msg1 = mm1;
}

@Override
public String toString() {
    return this.msg + "  " + this.msg1;
    }
}

class SubSam extends Sam {

String msg1="C";

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    SubSam obj = new SubSam();
    System.out.println(obj);
}

SubSam() {
    super("A", "B");
}
}

The output is:

A  B

Why "toString()" is refering the instance fields of "Sam" instead of "SubSam".The output should be: A C

I am thinking over it for a long time now, but not geting?

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1  
First, accept some answers to raise your accept rate so other people would answer to your questions. Second, have you tried debugging line by line before come here and ask? –  Luiggi Mendoza Dec 9 '12 at 18:34
    
The problem you are encountering is called "Shadowing" - take a look at this xyzws.com/Javafaq/what-is-variable-hiding-and-shadowing/15 –  Pr0gr4mm3r Dec 9 '12 at 18:36
    
@Luiggi Mendoza : When i am debugging then "this.msg1" is showing "C", but while printing it is printing "B". Why? –  Ritesh Kaushik Dec 9 '12 at 18:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're not overriding toString, so the toString method of the superclass is called. It prints msg and msg1 for the superclass, not for the subclass.

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Because instance variables in Java aren't overridden, quite simply. A subclass can define a variable with the same name as one defined in one of its superclasses, but it counts as a separate variable for all intents and purposes.

For example, consider the following code:

public class A {
    public String var;
}

public class B extends A {
    public int var;
}

Given those definitions, instances of B will have two variables, one being of type String, the other of type int, but both will be named var. They are still separate variables which can be independently assigned to and read from, and Java does not consider there being anything wrong with this.

If you want to override behavior as you indicate you want, you need to use methods instead. For instance, you could do it like this:

public class A {
    public String msg;
    private String msg1;

    public A(String mm, String mm1) {
        this.msg  = mm;
        this.msg1 = mm1;
    }

    public String msg1() {
        return(this.msg1);
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return(this.msg + " " + msg1());
    }
}

public class B extends A {
    public B() {
        super("A", "B");
    }

    @Override
    public String msg1() {
        return("C");
    }
}

Now, if you call System.out.println(new B());, it will print A C.

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When i am debugging then "this.msg1" is showing "C", but while printing it is printing "B". Why? –  Ritesh Kaushik Dec 9 '12 at 18:54
    
Because your SubSam instance has, in reality, not one but two variables named msg1, one defined by the Sam class and the other defined by the SubSam class. The code defined in the Sam class refers to the variable defined in the Sam class, which is assigned the value "B", while the code in the SubSam class refers to the variable defined in the SubSam class, which is assigned the value "C". Your debugger probably only shows one of them, since it is unusual practice to define variables with the same name. –  Dolda2000 Dec 9 '12 at 18:56
    
but i am printing an object of "SubSam" class, so in "toString()" "this" should refer to "SubSam instance"? –  Ritesh Kaushik Dec 9 '12 at 19:16
    
No, because the toString method is defined in the Sam class, so it refers the the variable defined therein. this does refer to a SubSam instance, for sure, but the toString code refers to the msg1 variable defined by the Sam class, since that's how that name resolves when the toString method is compiled. –  Dolda2000 Dec 9 '12 at 19:25

You are setting the msg1 in the sub-class, but in it's contructor you are passing

super("A","B");

At this point the variable that are being initialized in the super i.e. the contructor of main class are the main class' variable that are being used using the this keyword in toString method.

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