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this is possibly much of an elementary question, but I'm having trouble with a procedure I have to write in Scheme. The procedure should return all the prime numbers less or equal to N (N is from input).

(define (isPrimeHelper x k)
  (if (= x k) #t
  (if (= (remainder x k) 0) #f
      (isPrimeHelper x (+ k 1)))))

(define ( isPrime x )
    (cond
      (( = x 1 ) #t)
      (( = x 2 ) #t)
      ( else (isPrimeHelper x 2 ) )))

(define (printPrimesUpTo n)
    (define result '())
    (define (helper x)
        (if (= x (+ 1 n)) result
        (if (isPrime x) (cons x result) ))
        ( helper (+ x 1)))
    ( helper 1 ))

My check for prime works, however the function printPrimesUpTo seem to loop forever. Basically the idea is to check whether a number is prime and put it in a result list.

Thanks :)

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to careless editor: you shouldn't try to correct the problem that the Q is about, introducing too big a change in the meaning of the Q, by editing the Q itself (that's what answers are for); least of all introduce new bugs and broken code indentation. –  Will Ness Dec 11 '12 at 16:00
    
@Will: Look again at my edit.. I made no changes to the functionality of the code. Since the question was not about formatting, how was I attempting to answer the question with my edit? Also, I disagree that my indenting was broken. It was exaggerated, sure, but laying out the if forms so that each clause appears on a separate line is hardly broken. –  oobivat Dec 11 '12 at 22:29
1  
@oobivat no, I meant that you placed that (helper (+ x 1)) call far too much to the right and I thought it was the OP's mistake. The OP's confusion related to their indentation style - so changing it changed the meaning of the question. Look at the edit history of my answer to see what I mean (plus, you've missed a paren in your edit but that's less important). But all in good faith, I'm sure; and I place the fault more with the approvals, not with your edit itself - it's the approvals that were careless, actually, so I'm sorry for that, I was wrong there. :) Keep editing! :) –  Will Ness Dec 12 '12 at 9:51
1  
@Will: Ah, yes I did miss the indent on that helper call... point taken. –  oobivat Dec 12 '12 at 21:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, it is good style to express nested structure by indentation, so that it is visually apparent:

(define (isPrimeHelper x k)
  (if (= x k) #t
      (if (= (remainder x k) 0) #f
  ;; ^^ here
          (isPrimeHelper x (+ k 1)))))

(define (printPrimesUpTo n)
    (define result '())
    (define (helper x)
        (if (= x (+ 1 n)) result
            (if (isPrime x) (cons x result) ))
        ;; ^^ here
        ( helper (+ x 1)))
    ( helper 1 ))

Now it is plainly seen that the last thing that your helper function does is to call itself with an incremented x value, always. There's no stopping conditions, i.e. this is an infinite loop.

Another thing is, calling (cons x result) does not alter result's value in any way. For that, you need to set it, like so: (set! result (cons x result)). You also need to put this expression in a begin group, as it is evaluated not for its value, but for its side-effect:

    (define (helper x)
        (if (= x (+ 1 n)) result        
            (begin 
                (if (isPrime x) (set! result (cons x result)))
                (helper (+ x 1)) )))

Usually, the explicit use of set! is considered bad style. One standard way to express loops is as tail-recursive code, using named let, usually with a canonical name "loop":

(define (primesUpTo n) 
  (let loop ((x n) (result '())) 
    (cond 
      ((<= x 1) result)      ; return the result
      ((isPrime x) 
            (loop (- x 1) (cons x result)))
      (else (loop (- x 1) result)))))

which, in presence of tail-call optimization, is actually equivalent to the previous version.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you manually put those arrows into the code? –  turbo Dec 10 '12 at 16:48
    
@turbo yes, it wasn't that hard. :) –  Will Ness Dec 10 '12 at 16:49
    
Hah, I've just never seen someone do that before, was wondering if there was some sort of tool that did it. –  turbo Dec 10 '12 at 16:53

The (if) expression in your (helper) function is not the tail expression of the function, and so is not returned, but control will always continue to (helper (+ x 1)) and recurse.

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Aaah i see. So in the if when i do that check = x (+ 1 n) if it is true then i should exit the function. Something like return statement. Is there such a statement in scheme –  GeneralFailure Dec 9 '12 at 19:55
    
You don't need a return statement, though. Simply only execute (helper (+ x 1)) if (= x (+ 1 n)) is false; that is, in your case, as part of the second (if) expression. –  Dolda2000 Dec 9 '12 at 19:58

You have several things wrong, and your code is very non-idiomatic. First, the number 1 is not prime; in fact, is it neither prime nor composite. Second, the result variable isn't doing what you think it is. Third, your use of if is incorrect everywhere it appears; if is an expression, not a statement as in some other programming languages. And, as a matter of style, closing parentheses are stacked at the end of the line, and don't occupy a line of their own. You need to talk with your professor or teaching assistant to clear up some basic misconceptions about Scheme.

The best algorithm to find the primes less than n is the Sieve of Eratosthenes, invented about twenty-two centuries ago by a Greek mathematician who invented the leap day and a system of latitude and longitude, accurately measured the circumference of the Earth and the distance from Earth to Sun, and was chief librarian of Ptolemy's library at Alexandria. Here is a simple version of his algorithm:

(define (primes n)
  (let ((bits (make-vector (+ n 1) #t)))
    (let loop ((p 2) (ps '()))
      (cond ((< n p) (reverse ps))
            ((vector-ref bits p)
              (do ((i (+ p p) (+ i p))) ((< n i))
                (vector-set! bits i #f))
              (loop (+ p 1) (cons p ps)))
            (else (loop (+ p 1) ps))))))

Called as (primes 50), that returns the list (2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19 23 29 31 37 41 43 47). It is much faster than testing numbers for primality by trial division, as you are attempting to do. If you must, here is a proper primality checker:

(define (prime? n)
  (let loop ((d 2))
    (cond ((< n (* d d)) #t)
          ((zero? (modulo n d)) #f)
          (else (loop (+ d 1))))))

Improvements are possible for both algorithms. If you are interested, I modestly recommend this essay on my blog.

share|improve this answer

You can do this much more nicely. I reformated your code:

(define (prime? x)
  (define (prime-helper x k)
    (cond ((= x k) #t)
          ((= (remainder x k) 0) #f)
          (else
           (prime-helper x (+ k 1)))))
  (cond ((= x 1) #f)
        ((= x 2) #t)
         (else
          (prime-helper x 2))))

(define (primes-up-to n)
  (define (helper x)
    (cond ((= x 0) '())
          ((prime? x)
           (cons x (helper (- x 1))))
          (else
           (helper (- x 1)))))
  (reverse
    (helper n)))

scheme@(guile-user)> (primes-up-to 20)
$1 = (2 3 5 7 11 13 17 19)

Please don’t write Scheme like C or Java – and have a look at these style rules for languages of the lisp-family for the sake of readability: Do not use camel-case, do not put parentheses on own lines, mark predicates with ?, take care of correct indentation, do not put additional whitespace within parentheses.

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1  
This is incorrect: the number 1 is not prime. –  user448810 Dec 9 '12 at 23:42
    
@user448810: You are right of course, fixed this. –  user1710139 Dec 10 '12 at 6:03

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