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My Rails app has Post and Member models. Within posts/:id/show contains a "like" button which Members can click, or "Unlike" if @member has already "liked" this @post already.

(This button will link to a post action that does some ajax and makes the "like" button change into a "unlike" button)

Whats the best practice for caching the button? (below code obviously doesn't cache the button html).

Should I add :touch => true to member.rb, and then make a cache key for the button e.g. <% cache ['V1', @post, @member, 'like_button'] ? (seems redundant?)

post.rb

has_many :likes

like.rb

belongs_to :member
belongs_to :post

member.rb

has_many :likes

*posts/show.html.erb *

<% cache ['V1', @post, 'show'] do %>
  <h1>@post.title</h1>
  <div class="content">@post.content</div>
<% end %> 
  <%= render 'like_button', :post=> @post, :member => @member %> 

** posts/_like_button.html.erb **

<% if member.liked_post?(post) %> 
  <%= link_to unlike_post_path(post), :method => :post, :remote => true, :class => 'btn' %>
<% else %> 
  <%= link_to like_post_path(post), :method => :post, :remote => true, :class => 'btn' %>  
<% end %>
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do something along these lines:

<% cache ['V1', @post, @member.liked_post?(@post), 'show'] do %>
  <h1>@post.title</h1>
  <div class="content">@post.content</div>
  <%= render 'like_button', :post=> @post, :member => @member %> 
<% end %> 

This gives your 2 different cached versions of the fragment - one each for the 'liked' and 'not liked' states. This is better than 1 version per user.

YOu run the risk here of someone adding code to the like_button partial that uses more of the @member parameter, and that isn't part of the cache key, so you'll get incorrect results.

For this case, I'd change the like_button partial to take the same parameter as the cache call - @member.liked_post(@post) -- to make it clear that this is the only value used inside the partial code.

<%= render 'like_button', :post=> @post, :liked => @member.liked(@post) %> 

With the new partial:

<% if liked %> 
  <%= link_to unlike_post_path(post), :method => :post, :remote => true, :class => 'btn' %>
<% else %> 
  <%= link_to like_post_path(post), :method => :post, :remote => true, :class => 'btn' %>  
<% end %>
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Tom thanks for your comment. I'm interested in "best practice" -- it seems like it would be a Good Idea to cache the like_button partial separately from the rest of the page ? How can I still cache the button when post is not yet liked by member? (or is the cost small enough?) – tw airball Dec 25 '12 at 8:57
    
In your example the like button would be a :post method -- is this because its easier to cache, as opposed to using :get...? – tw airball Dec 25 '12 at 8:59
    
The 'like' button in my example is exactly the same as in your code - the only difference in the file is the first line of the file. In my example, you'll have 2 cached versions of the code for each post, one for people who have liked the post, and one for people who have not liked it. The Best Practice is to cache as much as possible, without making the system too hard to maintain. This is why I moved the @member.liked? call to outside the partial, to make it clear that this value - true or false - is the only thing that makes this partial behave differently. – Tom Fakes Dec 25 '12 at 18:07
    
There is overhead for retrieving cached fragments, so its good to reduce the number of memcache calls you need to make to build the page – Tom Fakes Dec 25 '12 at 18:11
    
Tom, I am running into this problem now and wanted clarification on your last point. If I have a list of 20 programs on a page that a User could both Like or Follow (for lack of better description). Is that going to be too many memcache calls? – dewyze Jun 8 '13 at 19:44

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