Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have join a table joining songs to genres. The table has a 'source' column that's used to identify where the genre was found. Genres are found from blogs, artists, tags, and posts.

So,

songs | song_genre                 | genres 
id    | song_id, source, genre_id  | id

What I want to build is a song SELECT query that works something like this, given I already have a genre_id:

IF exists song_genre with source='artist' AND a song_genre with source='blog'
OR exists song_genre with source='artist' AND a song_genre with source='post'
OR exists song_genre with source='tag'

I'm was going to do it by doing a bunch of joins, but am sure I'm not doing it very well.

Using Postgres 9.1.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
select id
from
(
    select distinct
    id,
    (
        select
        count(*) from
        song_genre b
        where a.id = b.song_id
        and b.source = 'artist'
    ) as artist,
    (
        select
        count(*) from
        song_genre b
        where a.id = b.song_id
        and b.source = 'blog'
    ) as blog,
    (
        select
        count(*) from
        song_genre b
        where a.id = b.song_id
        and b.source = 'post'
    ) as post,
    (
        select
        count(*) from
        song_genre b
        where a.id = b.song_id
        and b.source = 'tag'
    ) as tag
    from songs A
) AA
where
(AA.artist > 0 AND AA.blog > 0)
OR
(AA.artist > 0 AND AA.post > 0)
OR
(AA.tag > 0)
share|improve this answer
    
Getting a PG::Error: ERROR: column "artist" does not exist –  Nathan Wienert Dec 9 '12 at 21:32
    
I see I'm missing commas. Corrected. –  kgu87 Dec 9 '12 at 21:37
    
The basic idea here is that you set up your song list with boolean or numeric fields as proxies for what you want to use in more complex expressions. In this case, you need artist, blog post and tag fields to be added to each song. This is done in inner query. Making them numeric (0 or more) allows you to query on combined criteria in the outer query. –  kgu87 Dec 9 '12 at 21:49
    
Yea, played with this and got it to work. A bit slow on a bigger table, but orders of magnitude less than what I was working with before. I ended up figuring out the "as post" thing as well. –  Nathan Wienert Dec 9 '12 at 22:23
    
Additional idea is to get rid of sub-selects and introduce a function which takes song_id and source as params and returns true/false or count. Then SQL gets more readable, values are not being hard-coded into columns (source) and you can just use function calls directly in the where condition. –  kgu87 Dec 9 '12 at 22:36

kgu87's query is correct, but likely produces a relatively expensive plan with the numerous counts over subselects. All those counts can be accumulated with one pass over the genre table with cases on source and a group by song_id. Without sample data it's hard to say whether this is faster, but I suspect it's likely. I think it's simpler at any rate.

select g.song_id
from song_genre g
group by g.song_id
having
  ( sum(case when g.source = 'tag' then 1 else 0 end) > 0 )
  or
  ( sum(case when g.source = 'artist' then 1 else 0 end) > 0
    and (
      sum(case when g.source = 'blog' then 1 else 0 end) > 0
      or
      sum(case when g.source = 'post' then 1 else 0 end) > 0
    )
  )
share|improve this answer
    
Very good, I like this :) –  kgu87 Dec 9 '12 at 23:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.