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I have a large Swig Python module. The C++ wrapper ends up being about 320,000 LoC (including headers I guess). I currently compile this with -O1, and g++ produces a binary that is 44MiB in size, and takes about 3 minutes to compile it.

If I turn off optimisation (-O0), the binary comes out at 40MiB, and it takes 44s to compile.

Is compiling the wrapper with -O0 going to hurt the performance of the python module significantly? Before I go and profile the performance of the module at different optimisation levels, has anyone done this sort of analysis before or have any insight into whether it matters?

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2 Answers 2

-O0 deactivates all the optimizations performed by gcc. And optimizations matter.

So, without a lot of knowledge in your application, I could suggest that this will hurt the performance of your application.

A usually safe optimization level to use is -O2.

You can check the kind of optimizations performed by GCC in: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Optimize-Options.html.

But at the end, if you want to know exactly you should compile at different levels and profile.

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Thanks, I understand this. I wanted to know if anyone had any specific experience with Swig wrapper optimisation. A Google search not show anything published. –  elesueur Dec 9 '12 at 21:02
    
Then, I'm not your man. sorry. –  kxtells Dec 9 '12 at 21:04
    
No problem, thanks for your reply anyway! –  elesueur Dec 9 '12 at 21:11

This is bad irrespective of SWIG modules or not. There are many optimisations that happen even with gcc -O1 which you will miss if you prevent them happening.

You can check the difference by inspecting the asm generated by your compiler of choice. Of these the ones I trivially know will be detrimental to SWIG's generated wrapper:

  1. Dead code elimination:

    void foo() {
      int a = 1;
      a = 0;
    }
    

    With -O1 this entirely pointless code gets totally removed:

    foo:
            pushl   %ebp
            movl    %esp, %ebp
            popl    %ebp
            ret
    

    whereas with -O0 it becomes:

    foo:
            pushl   %ebp
            movl    %esp, %ebp
            subl    $16, %esp
            movl    $1, -4(%ebp)
            movl    $0, -4(%ebp)
            leave
            ret
    
  2. Register allocation will be detrimentally impacted in functions with lots of local variables - most SWIG wrapper functions will see a hit from this. It's hard to show a concise example of this though.

  3. Another example, the output from gcc compiling the SWIG wrapper for the prototype:

    int foo(unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int c,  unsigned int d);
    

    Generates with -O0:

    Java_testJNI_foo:
            pushl   %ebp
            movl    %esp, %ebp
            subl    $88, %esp
            movl    16(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -48(%ebp)
            movl    20(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -44(%ebp)
            movl    24(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -56(%ebp)
            movl    28(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -52(%ebp)
            movl    32(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -64(%ebp)
            movl    36(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -60(%ebp)
            movl    40(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -72(%ebp)
            movl    44(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -68(%ebp)
            movl    $0, -32(%ebp)
            movl    -48(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -28(%ebp)
            movl    -56(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -24(%ebp)
            movl    -64(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -20(%ebp)
            movl    -72(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -16(%ebp)
            movl    -16(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, 12(%esp)
            movl    -20(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, 8(%esp)
            movl    -24(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, 4(%esp)
            movl    -28(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, (%esp)
            call    foo
            movl    %eax, -12(%ebp)
            movl    -12(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, -32(%ebp)
            movl    -32(%ebp), %eax
            leave
            ret
    

    Compared to -O1 which generates just:

    Java_testJNI_foo:
            pushl   %ebp
            movl    %esp, %ebp
            subl    $24, %esp
            movl    40(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, 12(%esp)
            movl    32(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, 8(%esp)
            movl    24(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, 4(%esp)
            movl    16(%ebp), %eax
            movl    %eax, (%esp)
            call    foo
            leave
            ret
    
  4. With -O1 g++ can generate far smarter code for:

    %module test
    
    %{
    int value() { return 100; }
    %}
    
    %feature("compactdefaultargs") foo;
    
    %inline %{
      int foo(int a=value(), int b=value(), int c=value()) {
        return 0;
      }
    %}
    

The short answer is with optimisations disabled completely GCC generates extremely naive code - this is true of SWIG wrappers as much as any other program, if not more given the style of the automatically generated code.

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Thanks for the detailed answer. I'm still confused as to why -O0 produced a smaller binary than -O1. I will inspect the generated code a bit more closely and report back. –  elesueur Dec 10 '12 at 23:27

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