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I've tried several times to write a function to remove directories and the files within the directories, like rm -r, but I haven't managed to do it. The technique I've tried is:

/* rm command */
#include <fts.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

#define DEBUG

int rm_file(const char **argv);
int rm_tree(const char **argv);
void usage(void);

int rflag = 0;

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int ch;

    while((ch = getopt(argc, argv, "Rr")) != -1) {
        switch(ch) {
            case 'R':
            case 'r':
                rflag = 1;
                break;
            default:
                usage();
        }
    }
    argc -= optind;
    argv += optind;

    while(*argv) {
        if(rflag)
            rm_tree(argv);
        else
            rm_file(argv);
        argv++;
    }

    return 0;
}

int rm_tree(const char **argv)
{
    FTS *ftsp;
    FTSENT *ftsent;

    if((ftsp = fts_open(argv, 0, NULL)) == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't stat directory\n");
        return 1;
    }

    while((ftsent = fts_read(ftsp)) != NULL) {
        switch(ftsent->fts_info) {
            case FTS_DNR:
                fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't stat directory\n");
                break;
#ifndef DEBUG
            case FTS_D:
                rm_tree(&ftsent->fts_accpath);
                break;
#endif
            case FTS_F:
                if(unlink(ftsent->fts_accpath) == -1) {
                    fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't remove file\n");
                }
                break;
            case FTS_SL:
                if(unlink(ftsent->fts_accpath) == -1) {
                    fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't remove file\n");
                }
                break;
            default:
                if(unlink(ftsent->fts_accpath) == -1) {
                    fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't remove file\n");
                }
                break;
        }
    }

    if(rmdir(*argv) == -1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't remove directory\n");
        return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}

int rm_file(const char **argv)
{
    struct stat st;

    if(lstat(*argv, &st) == -1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't stat file\n");
        return 1;
    }

    if(S_ISDIR(st.st_mode)) {
        fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't remove directory\n");
        return 1;
    }

    if(unlink(*argv) == -1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "error: rm: can't remove file\n");
        return 1;
    }

    return 0;
}

void usage(void) 
{
    fprintf(stderr, "usage: rm file1 file2\n");
    exit(1);
}

But invariably, I get a segmentation fault or it just doesn't work. Am I looking in the right direction? I've tried using the ftw() functions and the opendir() functions, but I just haven't been able to figure out how to get this to work. I would appreciate it if someone could help.

The code included in the debug tags is where it tends to fail.

share|improve this question
3  
Have you considered tracking down where exactly it fails? You definitely do not provide enough context to diagnose. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Dec 9 '12 at 21:40
1  
Since fts_read() processes whole directory hierarchies, I think all you need to do for FTS_D is mark it for revisiting with fts_set(), so that the children are deleted, then you get a chance to remove the directory. Starting a new fts_open() means you have one fts_open() that started off traversing a structure, then a second one traversing part of the same structure, deleting stuff, and then you revert to the original one, which could now be confused by the fact that the hierarchy has been changed behind its back. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 9 '12 at 22:01
    
Thanks for the tip about fts_set(), I don't know why I didn't see that in the code, I'm going to take a look at it later. –  hcaulfield57 Dec 9 '12 at 22:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at how it is done in practice by analysing source code of rm in open source operating systems, e.g. OpenBSD (look for rm_tree).

share|improve this answer
1  
I've been reading OpenBSD source code for some time, I've already read through their rm command, but I can't figure out what they are doing when they get to case FTS_D. –  hcaulfield57 Dec 9 '12 at 21:48

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