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In lamens terms, what does a bitwise | operator do in Javascript and why is:

8 | 1 ; //9
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Duplicate question: stackoverflow.com/questions/276706/what-are-bitwise-operators –  aug Dec 9 '12 at 21:46
    
MDN docs –  I Hate Lazy Dec 9 '12 at 21:46
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Your asking for layman's terms on a programming forum? –  ValekHalfHeart Dec 9 '12 at 21:48
    
question just has nothing to do with javascript in particular. –  jAndy Dec 9 '12 at 21:48
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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

8 in binary = 1000
1 in binary = 0001

if you take each binary digit and treat them as if statements (1 being true and 0 being false), you get this:

1 || 0 = 1
0 || 0 = 0
0 || 0 = 0
0 || 1 = 1

and the result is 1001, which is 9 in decimal

If it had been 8 & 1, it would go like this:

1 && 0 = 0
0 && 0 = 0
0 && 0 = 0
0 && 1 = 0

and the result would be 0

Here's a quick example of how you might use these:

You would use the OR operator if you wanted to combine masks -

Using an example of file permissions, you may have the following flags:

1st bit - execute (bin - 001, dec - 1)
2nd bit - write (bin - 010, dec - 2)
3rd bit - read (bin - 100, dec - 4)

If you wanted to create a mask for read and execute, you'd do something like read value | execute value which is 1 | 4 which would give you 5 (101 in bin)

Now you have a mask that you can check a file's permissions to see if it has both of these permissions, using the & operator:

Example file 1 (has read, write, and execute)

Its permission value is 7 (111 in bin): 111 & 101 = 101, so it does have those perms

Example file 2 (has read and write)

Its permission value is 6 (110 in bin): 110 & 101 = 100, so it only has the 100 (4 in dec) perms (read) of the two provided from the mask

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The | operator is a bitwise OR.

8 (base 10) is 1000 (base 2; binary). 1 is 0001

So, 8 | 1 (base 10) is equal to 1000 | 0001 binary, which is 1001 binary, which is 9 (base 10).

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All values on a computer are stored on the hardware in binary format.

1 = 0001
2 = 0010
3 = 0011
4 = 0100
etc.

| is the OR operater, which combines all bits from both values:

8 - 1000
1 = 0001
--------
9 = 1001
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Well, in your example, take the binary representations:

8 = 0b1000
1 = 0b0001

Then apply a logical OR to each bit (hence "bitwise"): For each bit, if either one, the other or both is/are 1 then the result is 1, else the result is 0.

8|1 = 0b1001

Which is 9.

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It takes the binary representation of two numbers, and finds the union ("or") between them.

Consider the two you gave:

binary(8) = 1000
binary(1) = 0001

So, if a bit is 1 in the first number (8) or the second number (1) or if it is 1 in both then it is carried down to the result.

So, 8 | 1 = 9, because 1001 in binary is the result of the "or" operation and is 9 in decimal

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