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I want to keep total control over my game from the Main MovieClip and nowhere else. But I don't want to pass its instance through constructors neither do any .parent reference thingy from its children. Seems too workaroundish and unstable.

A sample situation:

public class Main extends MovieClip {
    public function Main() {
        addChild(new MainMenu());
    }

    public function startGame():void {
        trace("Game started");
    }
}

 

public class MainMenu extends Sprite {
    public function MainMenu() {
        var option:Option = new Option(); // Some BitmapData library linkage
        option.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, clicked);
        addChild(option);
    }

    public function destroy():void {
        // set null/dispose/removeChildren/removeEventListener/etc.
    }

    private function clicked(evt:MouseEvent):void {
        // Should trigger startGame() here (how?) to keep the flow at Main,
        destroy(); // since this has nothing to do with it anymore
    }
}

I wished for some Singleton-like solution, but there's no static class in AS3. And it seems bad practice from what I researched (or is it?).

Well, I just want to do everything from Main perspective with elegant code or at least official practice. How can I do this? (Please, tell me this is possible... :s)

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I'm also curious about this because I asked a question some weeks ago, and following the answers I ended in the same situation as you... –  user1842406 Dec 9 '12 at 22:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think there are 2 more ways that You can think about : Static instance :

public static var main:Main;
public function Main() {
    main = this;
    ...
}

and than:

public function MainMenu() {}

private function clicked(evt:MouseEvent):void {
    Main.main.startGame();
}

Or use some static dispatcher if Your app is not too big :

public static var dsp:EventDispatcher = new EventDispatcher();
public function Main() {
    dsp.addEventListener("StartGame",stageGame);
    ...
}

and in mainmenu :

 private function clicked(evt:MouseEvent):void {
    Main.dsp.dispatchEvent(new Event("StartGame"));
 }

Here You can always create additional class that will handle event dispatching / listening .

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For Singletons I use Grant Skinner's Singleton class which works well.

However, for your needs I don't think Singleton is the solution. Instead, I would have child objects dispatch custom events that the parent object will listen for. Here is a brief example, using the excellent AS3 Signals library instead of custom events:

public class Main extends MovieClip {
    public function Main() {
        var mainMenu:MainMenu new MainMenu();
        addChild(mainMenu);
        mainMenu.destroyed.add(startGame);
    }

    public function startGame():void {
        trace("Game started");
    }
}

And child:

public class MainMenu extends Sprite {

    public var destroyed:Signal;

    public function MainMenu() {
        destroyed= new Signal();
        var option:Option = new Option(); // Some BitmapData library linkage
        option.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, clicked);
        addChild(option);
    }

    public function destroy():void {
        // set null/dispose/removeChildren/removeEventListener/etc.
    }

    private function clicked(evt:MouseEvent):void {
       // Tell any class that is listening that this is being destroyed
       destroyed.dispatch();
       destroy();
    }
}

This way the MainMenu class doesn't need to know anything about Main; instead, it just dispatches signals when appropriate that instruct listening classes to take action.

There may be more elegant ways of handling this (I'm curious myself what approaches other people have to this problem), but this is the one I use generally and I find it works well.

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