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Is there any computational difference between these two methods of checking equality between three objects?

I have two variables: x and y. Say I do this:

>>> x = 5
>>> y = 5
>>> x == y == 5
True

Is that different from:

>>> x = 5
>>> y = 5
>>> x == y and x == 5
True

What about if they are False?

>>> x = 5
>>> y = 5
>>> x == y == 4
False

And:

>>> x = 5
>>> y = 5
>>> x == y and x == 4
False

Is there any difference in how they are calculated?

In addition, how does x == y == z work?

Thanks in advance!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Python has chained comparisons, so these two forms are equivalent:

x == y == z
x == y and y == z

except that in the first, y is only evaluated once.

This means you can also write:

0 < x < 10
10 >= z >= 2

etc. You can also write confusing things like:

a < b == c is d   # Don't  do this

Beginners sometimes get tripped up on this:

a < 100 is True   # Definitely don't do this!

which will always be false since it is the same as:

a < 100 and 100 is True   # Now we see the violence inherent in the system!
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bah you should add a note about confusing things probably being bad form .... (example 3) –  Joran Beasley Dec 9 '12 at 22:42
    
Is there a limit on objects to check for equality? ie. Can I use 4 objects: a == b == c == d? –  F3AR3DLEGEND Dec 9 '12 at 22:45
1  
There is no limit. –  Ned Batchelder Dec 9 '12 at 22:47
    
I must say a < 100 is True does look surprising, mostly because I would expect is to have precedence over other comparisons and thus be treated like a < (100 is True). –  lqc Dec 9 '12 at 22:54
2  
Note that the chain always compares the adjacent elements, so a == b == c == d is equivalent to a == b and b == c and c == d. It doesn't compare them all to a. For numbers (and equality) this rarely matters, but for objects with non-transitive semantics for some of the comparisons it can get strange. For instance, in Python 2, objects of different types compare unequal (unless they are specially coded to be aware of each other), so decimal.Decimal(0) == fractions.Fraction(0) is False. However, decimal.Decimal(0) == 0 == fractions.Fraction(0) is True. (Python 3 fixes this.) –  Blckknght Dec 9 '12 at 23:05
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