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The following code:

B() { 
   pid_t pid; 
   if ((pid=fork())!= 0) 
       waitpid(pid,NULL,0); 
   printf("2 "); 
   if (fork() == 0) 
      { printf("3 "); exit(0); } 
   printf("5 "); 
   exit(0); 
}

could have one of the outputs: and im not sure which one is the right output.

232553
235325
232355
235253
252533

these 2 lines mean if the pid is the parent, then wait for what?

if ((pid=fork())!= 0) 
           waitpid(pid,NULL,0); 

then if it is the child process (fork = 0), then print 3.. correct?

 if (fork() == 0) 
              { printf("3 "); exit(0); }
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closed as too localized by David Schwartz, WhozCraig, Dante is not a Geek, Ram kiran, NT3RP Dec 10 '12 at 3:38

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2  
The question is very confusing. You don't understand what fork() does. As soon as you do, come back if you still have questions –  Jo So Dec 9 '12 at 22:46
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
B() { 
   pid_t pid; 

   /* On success, fork() returns 0 to the child. It returns the child's process 
    * ID to the parent. So this block of code, executes a fork(), and has the
    * parent wait for the child.
    * Amusing sidenote: if the fork() fails, the parent will wait for *any* 
    * child process, since the return will be -1.
    */
   if ((pid=fork())!= 0) 
       waitpid(pid,NULL,0); 

   /* Both the parent and the child will print 2. The parent, will, of course,
    * only print 2 after the child exits, because of the waitpid above.
    */
   printf("2 "); 

   /* Now we fork again. Both the parent and the child from the previous fork will
    * fork again, although the parent will do it *after* the child exit. The resulting 
    * child process will print a single 3 and then exit.
    */
   if (fork() == 0) 
      { printf("3 "); exit(0); } 

   /* Now both the parent and the child print a 5 and exit */
   printf("5 "); 
   exit(0); 
}

As David Schwartz said, the output of this program will consists of some permutation of the digits 2, 3 and 5. No one output is correct, because the output depends on the order in which the processes execute, which is arbitrary.

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thanks, so it would be 22 (because there are 2 processes at this time), 33 (two 3's from the parent processes of 2's), then 55. –  jay lopp Dec 9 '12 at 22:52
1  
You will definitely get 2 of each, but the particular order is unclear. All you can be guaranteed is that it will start with a 2. –  Nik Bougalis Dec 9 '12 at 22:54
    
Downvoter: would you care to comment on the downvote? Is the answer wrong? Inaccurate? Too confusing? –  Nik Bougalis Dec 9 '12 at 22:55
    
thank you very much, Nick –  jay lopp Dec 9 '12 at 23:03
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The waitpid function waits for the child to terminate. Everything else you said is correct. There is no one right output for a program like this because it depends on the order in which the processes execute, which is arbitrary.

   if ((pid=fork())!= 0) 
       waitpid(pid,NULL,0); 

Okay, so now the parent will wait for the child to terminate.

   printf("2 "); 

The child will output 2 immediately. The parent will output 2 some time after the child terminates.

   if (fork() == 0) 
      { printf("3 "); exit(0); } 

Both the parent and child will fork. Both of their children will print 3 and exit.

   printf("5 "); 

Both the parent and original child will print 5.

   exit(0);

Both the parent and oringinal child will flush their output buffers and terminate.

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