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Im simply trying to mock up a data model in POCO. But I'm a little confused about something. Lets just assume for this example that I will be using Entity Framework for ORM. First I have a Phone and Address class:

public class Phone
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    int Number { get; set; }
}

public class Address
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Street { get; set; }
    public string Suite { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public int Zip { get; set; }
}

Next I have a Person and a Company class:

public class Person
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    string FirstName { get; set; }
    string MiddleName { get; set; }
    string LastName { get; set; }
    string Prefix { get; set; }
}

public class Company
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    int Name { get; set; }
}

Say I want both Person and company to have Phone or address lists so logically the way I might think about this from a code perspective would to create an abstract class, AContact:

public abstract class AContact
{
    ICollection<Phone> Phone { get; set; }
    ICollection<Address> Address { get; set; }
}

And make my Company and Person then inherit this:

public class Company : AContact
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    int Name { get; set; }
}

public class Person : AContact
{
    int Id { get; set; }
    string FirstName { get; set; }
    string MiddleName { get; set; }
    string LastName { get; set; }
    string Prefix { get; set; }
}

Alternatively I might create an Interface:

public interface IContact
{
    ICollection<Phone> Phone { get; set; }
    ICollection<Address> Address { get; set; }
}

And Implement the interface:

public class Company : IContact
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Name { get; set; }
    public ICollection<Phone> Phone { get; set;}
    public ICollection<Address> Address {get; set;}
}

Now I understand the difference here between abstract classes and interfaces. But how is this supposed to be implemented for Entity Framework to function? From a little searching around on the web it seems that as of 4.1 you can not do the Interface thing, so does that mean I have to use the abstract class? OR do I just have to explicitly define both properties in every class I want to use them in? Also what about something like RavenDB would this work there as well?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both options are possible.

When using your interface your DbContext will look like:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public IDbSet<Company> Companies { get; set; }
    public IDbSet<Person> People { get; set; }
}

You will get back Companies and People objects that also happen to implement the interface you specify.

When using the abstract class you will have the following:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public IDbSet<AContact> Contacts { get; set; }
}

With the abstract base class, you will have one entity set. With the OfType<T> you can filter the collection down to specific times.

RavenDB is a whole other subject. It's a NoSql database that works really smooth. It serializes your objects to JSON and just stores them for you. You can use (almost) every class structure you want.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the difference in how this gets translated by EF into an actual database? I'm inclined to just try and with RavenDB to eliminate the "translation." But I'm curious as to if this is a reasonable solution for an EF project. The reason I am doing this is because I have a base implementation that will be used by other projects that represents a "contact" but "Person" and "Company" only apply to respective implementations. Two different projects that use the same model and an base abstract context class but have different implementations of the context with their own properties. Make sense? –  Brandon Dec 13 '12 at 15:42
1  
The first option will be translated into a database with two completely separate tables. The second one needs some mapping. When mapping inheritance you have three options: Table Per Type, Table per Hierarchy, Table per Concrete Type (see weblogs.asp.net/manavi/archive/2010/12/24/…) –  Wouter de Kort Dec 14 '12 at 7:28
    
So I tried initially with the abstract class, and it actually worked great. However I ran into some issues trying to serialize to JSON. Apparently Json.NET requires you to implement CustomCreationConverter on POCO classes inheriting from abstract classes. So I would have a CompanyConverter and a PersonConverter The problem comes when you try to call JsonConvert.DeserializeObjectAsyn in that you have to pass that method to deserialize but cant figure out exactly what type of object it is to until after you deserialize it so I cant know which converter method to pass. –  Brandon Dec 16 '12 at 21:18
    
Also, when implementing repository pattern for the abstract class method. Would it be better to create a repository for each (Person & Company) or something just a single repository for both (AContact). I have a feeling this is going to lead to a lot of complexities later. But I have legitimate need to keep those to things separate as there will be two sites; one where Company makes sense and one where just Person is more appropriate and company would not be used at all. I don't mind just combining them if necessary, but this is really just more of an exercise in understanding at this point. –  Brandon Dec 16 '12 at 23:55
    
If I where you, I would ask a new question on the Json.NET problem with some sample code. I bet you will get more answers that way. On the Repository question, I would suggest that you Google for 'aggregate root'. Repositories are wildly used in Domain Driven Design. DDD offers advice on which repositories you should create. Personally, I would create two separate repositories, because Company and Person are two distinct entities that both have their own relations to other entities. –  Wouter de Kort Dec 17 '12 at 7:29

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