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How do I remove code duplication between similar const and non-const member functions?

In the following example :

template<typename Type, unsigned int Size>
class MyClass
{
    public: inline Type& operator[](const unsigned int i) 
    {return _data[i];}

    public: inline const Type& operator[](const unsigned int i) const
    {return _data[i];}   

    protected: Type _data[Size];
};

the const and non-const operator[] are implemented independently.

In terms of design is it better to have :

  • 1) two independant implementations like here
  • 2) one of the two function calling the other one

If solution 2) is better, what would be the code of the given example ?

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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt, Ram kiran, NT3RP, Mr. Alien, Mark Hurd Dec 10 '12 at 5:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
It's actually mentioned in Effective C++ Third Edition (Item 3) that one could do this in the non-const version: return const_cast<Type&>(static_cast<const MyClass&>(*this)[i]); I'd think it would help more if you had something other than just one line in each, though. –  chris Dec 10 '12 at 1:32
    
@chris I do hope you had to look up the edition and item number. A bit worrying otherwise .. :) –  Troy Dec 10 '12 at 1:35
    
@Troy, Indeed, all I remembered was reading something like that in one of those books. –  chris Dec 10 '12 at 1:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You couldn't have either implementation calling the other one without casting away constness, which is a bad idea.

The const method can't call the non-const one.

The non-const method can't call the const one because it'd need to cast the return type.

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It is a well-known and widely accepted implementation pattern, when non-const method is implemented through its const counterpart, as in

 class some_class {

   const some_type& some_method(arg) const
   {
     ...;
     return something;
   }

   some_type& some_method(arg)
   {
     return const_cast<some_type&>(
       const_cast<const some_class *>(this)->some_method(arg));
   }
 };

This is a perfectly valid technique, which essentially has no comparable (in convenience) alternatives in situations when the method body is relatively heavy. The evil of const_cast is significantly smaller than the evil of duplicated code.

However, when the body of the method is essentially an one-liner, it might be a better idea to stick to an explicit identical implementation, just to avoid this barely readable pileup of const_casts.

One can probably come up with a formally better designed castless solution implemented along the lines of

 class some_class {

   template <typename R, typename C>
   static R& some_method(C *self, arg)
   {
     // Implement it here in terms of `self->...` and `R` result type
   }

   const some_type& some_method(arg) const
   {
     return some_method<const some_type>(this, arg);
   }

   some_type& some_method(arg)
   {
     return some_method<some_type>(this, arg);
   }
 };

but to me it looks even less elegant than the approach with const_cast.

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Unfortunately, "constness" templates don't work but I still think it is worth considering the overall idea:

// NOTE: this DOES NOT (yet?) work!
template <const CV>
Type CV& operator[](unsigned int index) CV {
    ...
}

For the time being, I'd implement trivial functions just twice. If the code become any more complex than a line or two, I'd factor the details into a function template and delegate the implementation.

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