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new to C# so sorry if this comes off silly.

I have the following code so far regarding my dice:

Random DiceRandom = new Random();
int DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1, 7);
Console.WriteLine(DiceThrow);
Console.ReadLine();

Console.WriteLine("Player 1 rolled a " + DiceThrow);
Console.ReadLine();

Console.WriteLine("Player 2 rolled a " + DiceThrow);
Console.ReadLine();

Console.WriteLine("Player 3 rolled a " + DiceThrow);
Console.ReadLine();

Console.WriteLine("Player 4 rolled a " + DiceThrow);
Console.ReadLine();

Now, this creates a number fine and displays it, however it is the same number for every player.

I need a loop that repeats the roll for each individual player, and will roll again if a player rolls a 6.

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2  
come one! Surely you can work out you need to call DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1, 7); each time... If you set a variable once (in any language) what value do you expect it to have? –  Mitch Wheat Dec 10 '12 at 2:14
1  
@MitchWheat It's not necessarily obvious to people who are new to this. The line int DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1, 7); could be taken as, say, an inline definition of a function, if you weren't very familiar with C# and programming in general. –  Jeff Dec 10 '12 at 2:23
    
@Jeff: simple variable assignment is more likely to be assumed by a beginner than a function delegate. Right? –  Mitch Wheat Dec 10 '12 at 2:28
    
@MitchWheat Probably more likely, but someone more used to mathematics than coding could reasonably take the declaration as stating equivalence rather than assignment. –  Jeff Dec 10 '12 at 2:31
    
I can only speak for myself: I have a degree in pure maths. I remember learning to program. It was definitely variable assignment that came first to mind. –  Mitch Wheat Dec 10 '12 at 2:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The trouble, as others have pointed out, is that the random number DiceThrow is not refreshed each time you use it. You could fix this without using a loop, but don't. You do indeed need a loop, and probably one that looks something like this:

for(int i = 1; i <= 4; i++) {
    DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1,7);
    Console.WriteLine("Player " + i + " rolled a " + DiceThrow);
    Console.ReadLine();
    if(DiceThrow == 6) i--;
}

The last line is a little obscure, but is there to provide the "reroll on 6" requirement. Since the loop increments i each time, decrementing it will effectively make the loop go around for the same player again.

EDIT: Actually, a more explicit version of this using a while loop instead would be as follows:

int i = 1;
while(i <= 4) {
    DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1,7);
    Console.WriteLine("Player " + i + " rolled a " + DiceThrow);
    Console.ReadLine();
    if(DiceThrow != 6) i++;
}
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1  
It's generally not good practice to modify the loop variable. Then again, my answer has an infinite loop =) –  paddy Dec 10 '12 at 2:25
    
@paddy Yeah, I tend to agree with you, but the other option is either a nested for loop (undesirable also, but perhaps less so I'll admit) or a while loop with a very complicated expression such as while(player <= 4 && DiceThrow != 6) or something, and then only update ONE of those variables on each iteration, which sounds horrific to me. –  Jeff Dec 10 '12 at 2:27
    
I opted to use this code Jeff, thanks a lot worked perfectly. Now, as it's a game i'm making in which the players keep their scores adding up at the end of each round (i'll say a round is one roll each not including 6's) How would i display the cumulative score at the end of each round, followed by another round? –  user1890490 Dec 10 '12 at 2:33
    
@user1890490 I'm glad you found it useful (though I strongly recommend reading both the edit of my answer and paddy's answer, as well as the comments over there). I suggest another question regarding score - questions on Stack Overflow should generally be kept single-topic. Also - please accept the answer you found most useful :) –  Jeff Dec 10 '12 at 2:39
    
I've read all of the contributions thanks, and just accepted your answer! Another question regarding it will be on the way then –  user1890490 Dec 10 '12 at 2:41

How about:

for( int player = 1; player <= 4; player++ )
{
    while(1) {
        int DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1, 7);
        Console.WriteLine( "Player " + player + " rolled a " + DiceThrow );
        if( DiceThrow < 6 ) break;
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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The OP asked to roll multiple times if a player rolls 6. That inner loop is one way to achieve it. –  paddy Dec 10 '12 at 2:24
    
Yeah, a better version of this would be to have int DiceThrow; while((DiceThrow = DiceRandom.Next(1,7)) != 6){ but even that's pretty clumsy... –  Jeff Dec 10 '12 at 2:25
    
@paddy: good point: I missed that. –  Mitch Wheat Dec 10 '12 at 2:26
    
@Jeff Using a while loop in that way also wouldn't enter the loop to display the roll. That would be very clumsy. I know people are always going to be in two camps regarding while(1) loops, but I encounter them regularly in a professional sense. In C++, I would use a do { } while() construct, but I'm not sure if C# has this. –  paddy Dec 10 '12 at 2:28
    
Oh right, I see what you mean, my bad. –  Jeff Dec 10 '12 at 2:36

Not 100% sure of the readlines, etc. But essentially you are referencing the same dice throw each time you print it. What you need to do is generate a new roll (via DiceRandom.Next(1,7)) each time.

Random DiceRandom = new Random();

for (int i = 1; i <= 4; i++) {
    var roll = DiceRandom.Next(1,7);
    Console.WriteLine("Player 1 rolled a " + roll);
} 
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