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Suppose that the add method of MyList takes one argument, and is specified to throw a NullPointerException if null is given as its argument. Complete this JUnit test method to test that feature of the add method:

    public void testAddNull() {
    MyList<String> ls = new MyList<String>();

    }

this is the answer:

    public void testAddNull() {
    MyList<String> ls = new MyList<String>();
      try {
        ls.add(null);
        fail();
        } catch (NullPointerException e) {
      }
    }

why exactly is fail(); needed here, wouldn't the ls.add(null) cause it to fail, so isn't putting fail(); here redundant?

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You should take fail() off... –  rae1 Dec 10 '12 at 4:49
    
that's whats written in the answer key, if i take it off will it function the same? –  cloud9resident Dec 10 '12 at 5:07
    
I don't know, but you should try and find out. It is the quickest way of answering your question, but I don't have Java compiler at hand right now. –  rae1 Dec 10 '12 at 5:11
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1 Answer

The above test method will fail, if the ls.add(null); does not throw a NullPointerException. Since the desired behavior is to throw an exception, the test will pass when the exception is catched at catch (NullPointerException e).

With Junit 4 You could also do this:

@Test(expected = NullPointerException.class)
public void testAddNull() {
    ls.add(null);
}

which would require the tested code to throw a NullPointerException. Otherwise, the test would fail.

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