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I define a list as:

typedef struct LinkNode LinkNode;
struct LinkNode {
     int value;
     LinkNode *next;
};

And I use this LinkNode type in main():

int main()
{
    LinkNode *p;
    ...
}

When I do single-step debugging in VS2010, sometimes the debugger shows the local variable p's value as 0xcccccccc{value = ??? next = ???}, but what I confuse is in some cases the value of p->value and p->next are hidden in debugging, p's value shows as Oxcccccccc. (the membership's values are invisible)

I don't know what is the mechanism behind these representations. I just test two projects with almost the same code (different variable name but the same data structures) and the result is as above. So what's the problem?

Thanks!

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2  
The value 0xcccccccc is typical of uninitialized memory in the Visual Studio debugger. The debugger can't show what the members are because the pointer is not initialized. –  Joachim Pileborg Dec 10 '12 at 8:01
    
I agree, but whether the pointer is uninitialized or allocated, the members are still not shown in the local variable window. –  fishiwhj Dec 10 '12 at 8:46
    
Do you have Optimization enabled in the project's C/C++ properties? –  acraig5075 Dec 10 '12 at 10:08
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1 Answer

LinkNode *p is an uninitialized pointer. You have to construct the object first, is like write int* a and try to see what a point to. You have to write something like:

struct LinkNode {
     LinkNode(int value = int(), LinkNode* next = nullptr) :
               value(val), next(next)
     {
     }

     int value;
     LinkNode *next;
};

int main()
{
    LinkNode* p = new LinkNode();
    ...
    delete p;
}

EDIT
In c you have to use malloc and free... new and delete are not allowed.

typedef struct LinkNodeTag {         
     int value;
     struct LinkNodeTag *next;
} LinkNode;

LinkNode a = malloc(...);
free(a);

Unfortunatly I don't remember how malloc and free work...

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