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I have got Worker classes and a Handler class to create an abstraction layer for jobs already. I wanted to use std::async to pour some asynchrony into the mix but I got some weird behaviour from my Visual Studio 2012 (update 1).

My class hierarchy is as follows:

  • Worker is an abstract class with Init and Work as pure virtual methods.
  • BasicWorker : Worker is simply using printf for some output.
  • GroupWorker : Worker is an aggregation of other workers.
  • Handler holds on to a Worker to do some job.

Then I call several std::async methods in which I create workers and a handler, I call for handler in a nested std::async call and, I wait for initialization (std::condition_variable here) of the worker and then I stop the handler.

In the end I wait for all of the std::futures to finish.

The code is as follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <future>
#include <array>
#include <atomic>
#include <vector>

struct Worker
{
    virtual ~Worker() { }
    virtual void Init() = 0;
    virtual void Work() = 0;
};

struct BasicWorker : public Worker
{
    virtual ~BasicWorker() { }
    virtual void Init()
    {
        printf("\t\t\t\tInit: %d\n", std::this_thread::get_id());
    }

    virtual void Work()
    {
        printf("\t\t\t\tWork: %d\n", std::this_thread::get_id());
    }
};

struct GroupWorker : public Worker
{
    GroupWorker()
    {
        workers.push_back(std::make_shared<BasicWorker>());
    }

    virtual ~GroupWorker() { }

    virtual void Init()
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < workers.size(); ++i)
        {
            workers[i]->Init();
        }
        initEvent.notify_all();
    }

    virtual void Work()
    {
        for(int i = 0; i < workers.size(); ++i)
        {
            workers[i]->Work();
        }
    }

    void WaitForInit()
    {
        //std::unique_lock<std::mutex> initLock(initMutex);
        //initEvent.wait(initLock);
    }
private:
    std::mutex initMutex;
    std::condition_variable initEvent;
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Worker>> workers;
};

struct Handler
{
    static const int Stopped = -1;
    static const int Ready = 0;
    static const int Running = 1;

    Handler(const std::shared_ptr<Worker>& worker) :
        worker(worker)
    { }

    void Start(int count)
    {
        int readyValue = Ready;
        if(working.compare_exchange_strong(readyValue, Running))
        {
            worker->Init();

            for(int i = 0; i < count && working == Running; ++i)
            {
                worker->Work();
            }
        }
    }

    void Stop()
    {
        working = Stopped;
    }
private:
    std::atomic<int> working;
    std::shared_ptr<Worker> worker;
};

std::future<void> Start(int jobIndex, int runCount)
{
    //printf("Start: %d\n", jobIndex);
    return std::async(std::launch::async, [=]()
    {
        printf("Async: %d\n", jobIndex);
        auto worker = std::make_shared<GroupWorker>();
        auto handler = std::make_shared<Handler>(worker);

        auto result = std::async(std::launch:async, [=]()
        {
            printf("Nested async: %d\n", jobIndex);
            handler->Start(runCount);
        });

        worker->WaitForInit();
        handler->Stop();

        result.get();
    });
}

int main()
{
    const int JobCount = 300;
    const int RunCount =  5;
    std::array<std::future<void>, JobCount> jobs;

    for(int i = 0; i < JobCount; ++i)
    {
        jobs[i] = Start(i, RunCount);
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < JobCount; ++i)
    {
        jobs[i].get();
    }
}

My problem is:

  • If I uncomment the lines in WaitForInit@GroupWorker function then my nested asynchronous function calls are not made until all first level asynchronous function calls are made
  • While waiting std::condition_variable if I increase the number of jobs, creation of new threads feels like getting exponentially slow. For my trial below 100 jobs there exist some asynchrony but above 300 it is completely sequential to create jobs.
  • Then if I uncomment the printf line in Start method, all nested asynchrony works like a charm

So,

  • What am I doing wrong in usage of std::condition_variable?
  • Why creating jobs gets slower for like 100s of threads? (this question is optional, seems like a problem of OS and can be fixed with a smart thread-pool concept)
  • What has printf to do with any of this? (I tried deleting all printf calls in the case of a race condition and I put a breakpoint in the code but no help. It is the same case with std::cout too)

Edit: I have added launch policy (as suggested by Jonathan Wakely) for assuring the creation of a thread. But that did not help either. I am currently creating a std::thread and calling thread::join function for waiting inside the first level async.

share|improve this question
    
1) why are you using printf? there is cout. 2) when I try to compile using gcc 4.7 and run your code, I get an exception, meaning that you did something wrong even with the commented out code –  BЈовић Dec 10 '12 at 9:39
    
1) Since outputs are given in different threads cout << "Init" << id << endl interferes with other threads. Making such call atomic requires stringstream and its kind of verbosity. I am using printf for presentation purposes here. 2) It was working in my VS2012 and on ideone.com/YK6pxU. In my gcc (mingw) this does not even compile so I cannot help with that at the moment. –  zahir Dec 10 '12 at 11:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

N.B. it's OK to call printf, but not to assume std::thread::id is convertible to int. You could make that slightly more portable like so:

inline long tol(std::thread::id id)
{
  std::ostringstream ss;
  ss << id;
  return stol(ss.str());
}

(This still assumes the string value of std::thread::id can be converted to long, which isn't required, but is more likely than assuming an implicit conversion to int)

What am I doing wrong in usage of std::condition_variable?

You have no "condition" that you're waiting for and no synchronisation to ensure the call to notify_all happens before the calls to wait. You should have a member variable that says "this worker has been init'd" which is set by Init, and only wait on the condition variable if it's not true (that flag should be atomic or guarded by a mutex, to prevent data races).

Why creating jobs gets slower for like 100s of threads? (this question is optional, seems like a problem of OS and can be fixed with a smart thread-pool concept)

Because with hundreds of threads there is a lot of contention for shared resources and a lot of pressure on the OS scheduler, so the implementation probably decides to start returning deferred functions (i.e. as though std::async was called with std::launch::deferred) instead of async ones. Your code assumes async will not return deferred functions, because if an async worker and its nested async worker are both run as deferred functions the program could deadlock, because the outer function blocks waiting for the nested one to call Init but the nested function never runs until the out one calls result.get(). Your program is not portable and only works on Windows because (if I understand correctly) the MSVC async uses a work-stealing thread pool which will run a deferred function if a thread becomes available for it. This is not required by the standard. If you want to force each worker to have a new thread, use the std::launch::async policy.

What has printf to do with any of this? (I tried deleting all printf calls in the case of a race condition and I put a breakpoint in the code but no help. It is the same case with std::cout too)

It imposes a slight delay, and probably some form of unreliable ordering between threads since they are now contending, and probably racing, for a single global resource. The delay imposed by the printf might be enough for one thread to finish, which releases its resources to the thread pool and allows another async worker to run.

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried setting launch policy but it didn't help, I am going to stick to the idea anyways. And for race condition on the variable I have written something like this (incomplete WinAPI wannabe): ideone.com/BTyqRK. I guess it is going to solve deadlock problem. For the last printf issue: even if I am launching with async policy the system does not respond. I tried wait_for@future function for 1ms and looped as long as the result is deferred but it resulted in exceptions and errors. –  zahir Dec 11 '12 at 8:12
    
That code has nothing to do with WinAPI. There's no need to use a mutex and an atomic type. Since you need the mutex to use with the condition variable just use a mutex. N.B. the conventional way to refer to a C++ member function is future::wait_for not wait_for@future –  Jonathan Wakely Dec 11 '12 at 9:30
    
It was a quick recode and test. Did not have enough time to think about it. I was trying to mimic manual-reset-event from windows api. But I guess this is going to be another question:) thanks for your help –  zahir Dec 11 '12 at 17:54

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