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I need to support functionality that updates two concurrent dictionaries (on create, update, delete). Each operation (update, delete, create) uses two of them and should be atomic. What is the best way to do that in .NET C#.

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When you say "concurrent dictionaries" what class are you referring to? –  Tragedian Dec 10 '12 at 9:19
    
System.Collections.Concurrent.ConcurrentDictionary –  taminov Dec 10 '12 at 9:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The easiest way would be to use a lock:

private object m_methodMonitor = new object();

private void Update()
{
    lock (m_methodMonitor)
    {
        // Do whatever
    }
}


private void Delete()
{
    lock (m_methodMonitor)
    {
        // Do whatever
    }
}

PLEASE NOTE: Locking the "writing" operations on the dictionaries is not enough! You will also need to synchronize reading of the dictionary to avoid the case when you try to get a value from the dictionary, which is currently being accessed by one of the update methods.

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what about locking mechanism per key? –  taminov Dec 10 '12 at 9:17
    
It should be noted that for this to work wherever you access the dictionary instances, you must do so inside similar lock statements, not just for the three operations listed. –  Tragedian Dec 10 '12 at 9:18
    
@Tragedian: Right, I'll update my answer. –  Thorsten Dittmar Dec 10 '12 at 9:19
2  
I don't see why you need to use two locks? Also, whenever you use two locks you run the risk of deadlock if you along two code paths try to take the locks in different sequences. –  Martin Liversage Dec 10 '12 at 9:25
1  
-1 for using two locks. That's dangerous and unnecessary here! –  Sebastian Negraszus Dec 10 '12 at 9:44

The challenge here is the requirement that both dictionaries must be modified atomically. The ConcurrentDictionary<TKey,TValue> class doesn't have any built-in mechanisms to support "grouping" instances together to allow simultaneous updates of key-value pairs which share the same key.

As a result, there isn't any high-throughput mechanism you can use which grants you atomicity in your operations.

The only thing you can do to get atomic operations over a group of objects is to wrap access to the objects in a locking mechanism:

public void Update(...)
{
    lock(this.dictionaryLock)
    {
        this.dictionaryA.AddOrUpdate(...);
        this.dictionaryB.AddOrUpdate(...);
    }
}

You might get better results with different locking mechanisms, optimising to your application's common patterns (e.g. using a ReaderWriterLockSlim if your application tends to read frequently and modify infrequently), but you will only be able to serialise access to the entire dictionary.

If concurrent performance is very important to you, you must refactor your design to use a single concurrent dictionary instead of two.

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